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Author Topic: Voodoolily's Snacktastic Recipe Thread!!  (Read 214664 times)
Sky
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Reply #1750 on: June 21, 2017, 09:18:02 PM

So my food processor. I'm barely tapping into its potential and loving it.

I did some cod cakes with a garlic lemon aeoli (using my homemade olive oil mayo of course). After making the mayo and aeoli, just pulse some cod cubes. Put in a chilled bowl and lightly toss with some aeoli, s&p, an egg yolk and a little panko. Then form into cakes, lightly coat with panko (the internal yolk/aeoli moisture means a 1 step dredge!) and sautee in hot oil, flipping once to preserve the crisp coating.

But tonight's bachelor noms were even simpler. Just pulsed some 1" cubed chuck steak (I had to stop into the hell that is walmart, so I scrapped real dinner plans due to the scarcity of quality ingredients and found a nicely marbled piece of chuck). Into the chilled bowl, tossed with some s&p (mid-coarse p), garlic/onion powder and smoked paprika. Smoking hot pan for a couple minutes a side, then reduce and give it another couple minutes on each side to cook the interior. Crusty and delicious. Onto toasted potato rolls with some provo and A1 thick for the acidity.

I'd probably change the A1 out because it overpowered the smoked pap, though it did balance the fat of the burgers nicely. If I had access to better ingredients, probably would top with some greens tossed in herbed vinegar instead.

Nebu
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Reply #1751 on: June 22, 2017, 07:36:02 AM

So my food processor. I'm barely tapping into its potential and loving it.

This is something I need to work on as well.  I see pros make pasta with a food processor and I just can't get the process right.  I can make fresh pasta by hand, but tend to overwork the dough or not get the consistency right when I use a food processor.  I must look to the wisdom of Youtube!

"Always do what is right. It will gratify half of mankind and astound the other."

-  Mark Twain
MrHat
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Reply #1752 on: June 22, 2017, 09:05:44 AM

My food processor remains my great shame as a half Lebanese.

I've tried and failed, several times, to make restaurant style garlic sauce for chicken.  It takes emulsifying oil with garlic and lemon juice.  I've dredged youtube, recipe books, even talked with a friend that runs a restaurant back home.  I just can't get the sauce to stay the right consistency.

Sky
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Reply #1753 on: June 22, 2017, 03:00:02 PM

So my food processor. I'm barely tapping into its potential and loving it.

This is something I need to work on as well.  I see pros make pasta with a food processor and I just can't get the process right.  I can make fresh pasta by hand, but tend to overwork the dough or not get the consistency right when I use a food processor.  I must look to the wisdom of Youtube!
I've been holding out for a stand mixer to try pasta by machine. I've had success making it by hand, but I don't like rolling it out and cutting it (I'd get a pasta attachment to roll sheets on the mixer).

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Reply #1754 on: June 22, 2017, 03:07:19 PM

My food processor remains my great shame as a half Lebanese.

I've tried and failed, several times, to make restaurant style garlic sauce for chicken.  It takes emulsifying oil with garlic and lemon juice.  I've dredged youtube, recipe books, even talked with a friend that runs a restaurant back home.  I just can't get the sauce to stay the right consistency.

Maybe a blender instead?

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Reply #1755 on: June 23, 2017, 03:30:25 AM

Stick blender, use that with the garlic, oil, and lemon juice, can you cheat an add any vinegar? Emulsions can be a bear to keep right.

Oh not sure if this goes here or should put in beer thread, but found leinenkugel watermelon shandy was a bit off in taste, almost too sweet. But then I picked up a 6 pack of Mike's Hard Watermelon lemonade, and when you mix the two together, one decent shandy. By themselves they were sweet, but then together it balanced out. That and grilled hot dogs on the coals were awesome summer night (the new oscar meyer all angus beef are pretty decent for a mid week meal). I'm going to make a watermelon "skip and get naked" drink later this week. That or a gin fizz with watermelon, since they are up and available at the stands.
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Reply #1756 on: June 23, 2017, 03:58:13 PM

So my food processor. I'm barely tapping into its potential and loving it.

This is something I need to work on as well.  I see pros make pasta with a food processor and I just can't get the process right.  I can make fresh pasta by hand, but tend to overwork the dough or not get the consistency right when I use a food processor.  I must look to the wisdom of Youtube!
I've been holding out for a stand mixer to try pasta by machine. I've had success making it by hand, but I don't like rolling it out and cutting it (I'd get a pasta attachment to roll sheets on the mixer).

I make my own pasta fairly regularly. I don't have a mixer to put the cutting attachment on, so I picked up a "pasta mandolin". Basically just a frame with like 20 guitar strings stretched tight across it. Not perfect, but it does result in uniform linguine pretty quickly. My kick lately though has been herb and ricotta ravioli in olive oil/butter with Parmesan.

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Reply #1757 on: July 26, 2017, 05:41:27 PM

Seeking another silly hobby, I've taken to hand-sharpening my cutlery for the last few months or so.  I have no idea how I managed beforehand - I'd keep them what I thought was sharp, but a freshly honed and stropped blade is damn near magic.

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Reply #1758 on: July 27, 2017, 10:18:06 AM

It is quite an art to do well (I'm terrible at it). I've watched my sister's step-father-in-law, who is the Canadian equivalent of a Hillbilly, work on an old rusty knife that basically looked like a small machete. Five minutes later, he had that thing sharp enough to go through a Christmas Ham like butter. It was frighteningly sharp.

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Reply #1759 on: July 27, 2017, 06:25:47 PM

It is quite an art to do well (I'm terrible at it). I've watched my sister's step-father-in-law, who is the Canadian equivalent of a Hillbilly, work on an old rusty knife that basically looked like a small machete. Five minutes later, he had that thing sharp enough to go through a Christmas Ham like butter. It was frighteningly sharp.

I didn't find it that tough to pick up, though I also leveraged some of the stuff I learned about sharpening woodworking chisels years ago, which was a huge help going in.  I mostly spent an an hour or so watching videos and reading and was able to get solid results from the get go.

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Reply #1760 on: July 27, 2017, 10:12:58 PM

Growing up redneck, had to learn to sharpen stuff. Axes, chisels, knives, mower blades, etc. It's also humorous that my fiancee gets scared every time I use my honing steel in the kitchen. Too many movies!

When I was a kid I sometimes used the wheel, but now I just use the hand stone when they need some touching up. Great skill to have.

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Reply #1761 on: September 11, 2017, 12:19:46 PM

I have no idea where to put this question - we need a new wok. Any recommendations? We use ours twice a week at least.

I was prepared to spend $300+, but a few reviews said the expensive ones are crap. They recommended a carbon steel, though the models they provided look bit too cheaply made for my liking (the rivets looked like they will crack the wok surface over time).

Our current wok is 5 years old and had a non-stick surface that is wearing off. I'd rather go to a more traditional style, if that makes sense.
Nebu
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Reply #1762 on: September 11, 2017, 12:46:36 PM

I have one of these and it has served me very well. 

You do have to season it and be careful of rust since it's carbon steel.  I have to heat dry mine after use and apply a tiny amount of surface oil.

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Reply #1763 on: September 11, 2017, 12:53:59 PM

I have no idea where to put this question - we need a new wok. Any recommendations? We use ours twice a week at least.

I was prepared to spend $300+, but a few reviews said the expensive ones are crap. They recommended a carbon steel, though the models they provided look bit too cheaply made for my liking (the rivets looked like they will crack the wok surface over time).

Our current wok is 5 years old and had a non-stick surface that is wearing off. I'd rather go to a more traditional style, if that makes sense.
What kind of range do you have (gas, electric, induction, etc.)?
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Reply #1764 on: September 11, 2017, 12:57:55 PM

Thanks - that's one of the models I was looking at. Good to know it holds up.
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Reply #1765 on: September 11, 2017, 01:01:26 PM

I have no idea where to put this question - we need a new wok. Any recommendations? We use ours twice a week at least.

I was prepared to spend $300+, but a few reviews said the expensive ones are crap. They recommended a carbon steel, though the models they provided look bit too cheaply made for my liking (the rivets looked like they will crack the wok surface over time).

Our current wok is 5 years old and had a non-stick surface that is wearing off. I'd rather go to a more traditional style, if that makes sense.
What kind of range do you have (gas, electric, induction, etc.)?


Electric. As much as I prefer gas, it would be $1500+ to have them run gas lines to that side of the house.
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Reply #1766 on: September 11, 2017, 01:02:00 PM

Thanks - that's one of the models I was looking at. Good to know it holds up.

I would only go carbon steel if you have a gas range.  It's tough to properly season a wok on an electric.

"Always do what is right. It will gratify half of mankind and astound the other."

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Reply #1767 on: September 11, 2017, 01:10:16 PM

Hrmm. Can you properly season it in the oven (if the model has a metal handle)?
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Reply #1768 on: September 11, 2017, 01:14:01 PM

What kind of range do you have (gas, electric, induction, etc.)?
Electric. As much as I prefer gas, it would be $1500+ to have them run gas lines to that side of the house.
In that case it doesn't really matter what you get as long as its flat bottomed awesome, for real

While carbon steel that you will have to season and maintain yourself is what's generally recommended, because you have electric you may want to consider either just a cast iron pan or a cast iron wok for stir-frying since those will retain heat much better than a carbon steel wok.

Edit: added context
« Last Edit: September 11, 2017, 01:18:07 PM by Trippy »
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Reply #1769 on: September 11, 2017, 01:15:28 PM

Hrmm. Can you properly season it in the oven (if the model has a metal handle)?
The handles are removable on that Joyce Chen model. You can also do the seasoning on the stove.
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Reply #1770 on: September 11, 2017, 01:39:27 PM

Hrmm. Can you properly season it in the oven (if the model has a metal handle)?

I don't think an electric oven will get hot enough.  You pretty much have to get the pan hot enough to see the heat transition.  I have an electric stove but seasoned it over a gas camping burner. 

I like this pan far better than my old non-stick wok, but it does come with it's inconveniences. 


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Reply #1771 on: September 11, 2017, 01:54:55 PM

Much appreciated, both of you. Thanks!
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Reply #1772 on: September 11, 2017, 10:03:44 PM

Have I mentioned my current obsession with swordfish steaks? Apparently the local fish counter got a stable supplier, at least a couple times a week I can get really clean cuts. They are heaven on the grill with just a little s&p.

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Reply #1773 on: September 11, 2017, 10:41:32 PM

Have I mentioned my current obsession with swordfish steaks? Apparently the local fish counter got a stable supplier, at least a couple times a week I can get really clean cuts. They are heaven on the grill with just a little s&p.

Be careful.  Swordfish is known to have among the highest mercury levels and it is often recommended that you don't eat it more than once a month unless you have a reliable and tested source.

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Reply #1774 on: September 29, 2017, 07:33:53 PM

Hrmm. Can you properly season it in the oven (if the model has a metal handle)?

I don't think an electric oven will get hot enough.  You pretty much have to get the pan hot enough to see the heat transition.  I have an electric stove but seasoned it over a gas camping burner. 

I like this pan far better than my old non-stick wok, but it does come with it's inconveniences. 



Grapeseed oil and use the cleaning cycle on an electric oven.  The end result.is hard and damn near as slick as a Teflon coating.

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Reply #1775 on: September 29, 2017, 07:52:33 PM

Grapeseed oil and use the cleaning cycle on an electric oven.  The end result.is hard and damn near as slick as a Teflon coating.

Well then... I stand corrected.

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Reply #1776 on: October 03, 2017, 06:35:11 PM

So Bon Appetit has this show on YouTube called 'It's Alive With Brad', which is pretty great.  He basically does live and/or fermented stuff.

One of his earlier episodes was making half-sour (fermented) pickles.  As a pickle fan, I had to try it.  Holy crap, these are great.  I left out the rosebuds and added some of the Trinidad Scorpions I got from a friend and pickled a couple of weeks ago and they just finished fermenting.  Literally the best pickles I've ever had and now I need more jars.

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Reply #1777 on: October 03, 2017, 09:33:48 PM

Nice! I got some of the stuff for pickling this year, but didn't plant enough cukes to dig in. Got some jars and a canner, ready for next year...

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Reply #1778 on: December 06, 2017, 11:39:33 AM

Ok, so I guess this has become the food thread.  So I'm going to post food pictures here.  Schild has been yelling at me to post pictures of my meals since I entered SE asia for awhile, and its just easier to do it here.

First, the setup.  I live in Laos.  It has some pretty rad and unique food.  I also have a Lao maid that cooks for me once a week (I have her come once a week, but tell her to cook a bunch of food for me to eat the remainder of the week).  I've also been traveling around Thailand, so also have some good pictures from there.  So here's some things I've ate.

First, a few pictures of things that have greeted me when I've returned home from work, cooked by my maid (mind you, she speaks zero English, so I only talk to her through elaborate charades):

Yummy khao piak sen (can't really see the noodles, but its a lao noodle dish):


So this is basically a deep fried omelet.  Very popular here.  It's an omelet with local herbs/veggies that's then deep fried.  Really good, and she also made be a big pot of what seemed to basically be miso soup, but with giant chunks of ginger.


Nice setup.  Crispy pork belly chopped into bits, stewed green veggies of some sort (which was actually quite good), crispy pork ribs, home made spicy sauce, and some rice to go along with it.  Note, Lao cook all pork super crispy.  It's really tasty, but I'm pretty sure its also because in this country, under-cooked pork will kill you.


I came home to find this entire feast before me one day.  The meat thing is one half of the entire hip of a pig (nobody eats straight pork chops here.  Its like, every other part of the pig).  Next to that, some crazy curry stew that had giant hunks of bamboo shoots and ginger hunks in it.  It was AMAZING.  And then finally, a bowl of mashed potatoes, because I'm white and that's what other Americans want.  I manged to get through to her that I did not want such things.


Heres a close up on the pigs hip bone I had to gnaw my way through for the rest of the week.


Maybe I went a little to far, because this is what she cooked for me after the incident.  Maybe went a little to Lao for me.  But, while I did avoid the head, the fish mixed with what ever crazy homemade sauce she created was amazing.  Scales and all.  I just refuse to eat the head, which the lao tell me is where all the flavor is.


And just to note, my plates are hand painted, traditionally made polish pottery I grabbed while living there.  I don't mind having dishes that make me look like an old grandmother, they're awesome!



Ok, so now some food from around Laos itself!


One of my first meals.  Duck Larb with a side of black sticky rice.  About as traditional Lao as you can get (they eat sticky rice with everything).  Also spicy as hell.


So, Lao BBQ is everywhere.  Basically like, you'll see these places all over the city where people come and sit and drink till late into the night, no matter the night.  They'll basically cook some sort of meat they specialize in on cheap ass grills out front, and you ask for it.  They chop up the meat, and then give you a plate of lettuce and all sorts of herbs and spices.  You take the lettuce, put the meat in it, then mix in all the herbs, along with what ever spicy sauce they are giving you, and eat it like a taco (sort of how Koreans do a lot of their BBQ).  It is actually really damn good, and it hasn't killed me yet.

Here is some duck from near my house.  Also mixed with that, cut up Water Buffalo blood sausage.


Another of the same sort of places near my house. This time, a plate of pigs cheek and pigs tongue to go with everything.


We have a KFC near my house!  KFC, but actually Khouvieng Fried Chicken (Khouvieng is the road its on).  A staple in Vientiane, they take strips of chicken, cover them in a thick layer of batter, deep fry them in a wok next to the table/street, and then immediatly throw it to your plate.  Its amazing.


Basically tried the Lao version of Bahn Mi at a little stand near my house.  Same idea (Laos was colonized by France and it was joined with Vietnam in the colony of IndoChina), but they use Lao fermented white sausage, and lots of mayo.  Or at least this place did.  Tasty, though I liked Banh mi in Saigon better.  But I need to try more stands here to get a better idea of quality.


This is from the cafeteria at the embassy, which is pretty good and cooks all sorts of crazy Lao food for lunch.  Great soup, and the big hunks there are coagulated pig's blood.  What other US Government facility will serve you coagulated pig's blood for lunch?


Another nice soup served in our cafeteria.  



Ok, to add some context to the next few photos.  I good friend of mine came to visit and we traveled around Laos seeing the sights and eating the great food in various places.  She's my 'date' in the next few photos.  ;)

We took a mini-bus through the heart of Laos up to the old capital of Luange Prabang.  We had time to get some lunch at a Hmong village at the top of the mountain.  They had some crazy spiced soup thing I'd never seen before, so I ordered it.  Very unique, though probably have to develop a taste for it.


No really, we ate this at the top of a mountain.



In Luang Prabang, we ate at Tamarind, which is probably the best high class Lao food in the Country.  Best way to get the unique taste of the area at high quality.  Here is the initial serving set.  That's water buffalo sausage (which is great), with three different types of jeow's (basically hot sauces).  The one on the left most is Jeow Bong, which is a chili paste simmered with the skin of water buffalo.  Its the most amazing thing ever, and is traditionally eaten with sticky rice (the rice in the basket you see), or more specifically, mekong river weed, which you can see laying under the Jeow's.  It's just like seaweed, but they dry it with spices and its awesome.


Next up, the most signature dish there.  Chicken stuffed in lemongrass.  No, its not lemongrass stuffed in chicken, but the other way around.  Those two fried things you see are lemongrass stalks, perfectly split down the middle so the break into about 10 strands, with chick stuffed into them, and the whole thing deep fried.  Its glorious.  Also has an amazing sauce in that square bowl (but that's how Laos/SE asia rolls).  Not sure what the sort of Zuchini slices looking plate was, but it wasn't that great.  We'll forget.


And in the banana leaf with it all is Mok Pa, which is a heavily spiced fish steamed in banana leaves.  Also very tasty.


For desert we had this crazy mix of fruits and sweet bean paste.  Great restaurant, a must if you actually decide on visiting Laos (they also have cooking classes for everything they make).


Later in Luang Prabang, we ate in one of the major food streets.


And of course got a giant fish on a stick in Banana leaves to eat (was REALLY good, surprisingly).



Ok, and while this happened earlier than the rest, here is some food from my trip to Chiang Mai.  Chiang Mai is an old temple city in Northern Thailand that, if you don't want to see beaches, is probably the best city to go hang out in.  Wonderful food, great scenery, ect.  They have a special dish they share with Laos and Burma called Khao Soi.  It's different in all those places, but Thai Khao Soi is one of my favorite things ever.  Look it up, but its basically a heavy curry mixed with friend and un-fried noodles, and a chicken leg or pork/beef.  So I naturally went around and tried every bowl I could at the top rated places for the 4 days I was there.  Here is the first shitty one I tried at a tourist trap.  You can tell because it has chunks of chicken instead of a drumstick.


Now this was amazing.  One of the top restaurants, and so savory.


Here is the more rare'er beef version.  It was really tasty as well.  I tried the muslim version of this at several places in the city, but they seemed way weaker.  Alas, I didn't remember to take any good pictures.


And just to compare, here is a version of it I got as served in Bangkok (its a northern Thai dish, so pretty hard to find or get good in bangkok).


To further compare, as I mentioned, Laos has its own version of Khao Soi (called Luang Prabang Khao Soi).  The difference is that it doesn't use use a curry base for its soup, has no deep fried noodles, and mainly uses ground up buffalo for its meat base.  It is in fact really tasty, but not nearly as strong flavored or unique as Chiang Mai style.  But here is a nice bowl of it straight from the city itself:


As I mentioned, Chiang Mai is a great food city.  One of the most famous things to eat is Khao Kha Moo (stewed pork leg, basically) from the food markets.  Especially from 'the girl wearing the cowboy hat'.


God damn amazing.  Here is the plate I got for a few dollars.




Ok, I have more pictures, but its late at night and trump is about to announce that he wants everybody to try and blow up my place of work around the world.  Hope you foodies enjoy, and I'll try to update some more with other pictures!
« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 09:43:55 AM by Teleku »

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Reply #1779 on: December 06, 2017, 12:09:28 PM

ayyyyyy i want all that in my mouth
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Reply #1780 on: December 06, 2017, 12:24:46 PM

For real fuck that looks awesome.

I'm having banh mi for dinner. Wonder if I can find that fermented sausage.

Also, meat on a stick is just the best everywhere.
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Reply #1781 on: December 06, 2017, 12:55:56 PM

That all looks amazing!

F13 needs a drooling emoji for pics like that. 

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Reply #1782 on: December 06, 2017, 01:02:44 PM

I think we need a separate Food Porn thread.

Bacon Wrapped Water Chestnuts:

One can whole water chestnuts
Soy Sauce
Sugar
Bacon (this is the only time I prefer thinner bacon)
Toothpicks

Open and drain the water chestnuts.  Count them.  Cut 1/2 as many slices of bacon in half (so that you have one half slice of bacon per WC.

Preheat oven to 340 (10 less than 350) with a rimmed baking pan in it.   

Add soy to the chestnuts in the can and let them absorb the soy for ~ 5 minutes.

Fill a bowl with sugar.  Roll a soy soaked waterchestnut in sugar, wrap in a half slice of bacon and stab with a toothpick to hold the bacon in place (and give you a handle).

Place them on a sheet of parchment paper.  Once the oven is heated, slide the parchment onto the preheated pan. 

Bake for ~40 minutes until bacon is crispy.  You can go longer, but be careful if your oven has a wide heat cycle (goes well over 350 for a period when set to 340) - you do not want to burn the sugar.

You're welcome.

-----

Why 340 rather than 350?  Sugar is exposed to the air in this recipe, and we want to keep it from getting to a burnt stage - ideally it caramelizes a bit without burning. 

Candy Making and Sugar Temperatures


I miss Good Eats.  *Sniff*
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Reply #1783 on: December 06, 2017, 02:15:55 PM

That's a pretty amazing looking tour of food Teleku, thanks.

Since we are reviving this thread...

A Pepper Lunch opened up near here and I'd never tried it before. Was good, but decided I didn't want to pay them for what I could do at home.

Make rice.
Prep 1/2 cup corn, 1/4 cup sliced green onions
Buy some paper thin sliced beef (my local place offers chuck and it works great)
Make a good, thickened, homemade teriyaki or similar sauce, based on personal taste - mine is made with fresh ginger and garlic.

Heat up your Cast Iron skillet
When its close to temp, melt 2 Tbs Butter in a pan and toss in the corn and onions (just briefly)
Find a bowl that would fit in your skillet with about 1.5 - 2 inches room all around the outside
Fill it with rice and then plop your rice dome in to the middle of the pan.
Drizzle the butter, corn, and onions on top of the rice
Add your sliced beef around the outside of the pan and turn off the heat. It will cook at the table.
Grind a shit ton of black pepper all over the rice, and serve - in the pan.
Add a little of your chosen sauce to the beef at the table.

It's all about how the rice gets crunchy on the bottom.

"Welcome to the internet, pussy." - VDL
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Khaldun
Terracotta Army
Posts: 8782


Reply #1784 on: December 06, 2017, 06:28:27 PM

That's some amazing shit.

I was looking at the soup with the pig's blood and thinking, "That has blood in it, man" and then I read your description.

My brother spent some time in Laos and Northern Vietnam and he just loved Laos and really hated Northern Vietnam--foodwise, local community wise, etc. I found that really interesting--he thought they were worlds apart.
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