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Author Topic: Voodoolily's Snacktastic Recipe Thread!!  (Read 181187 times)
voodoolily
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WWW
on: July 08, 2005, 11:50:54 AM

Okay, if one of the admins wants he can move all the food talk from Stray's Big Win thread over here. Otherwise, we can talk about food and exchange recipes. Yay!

To begin, I'll discuss the current holder of my "Best Dinner EVAR" award, which I made for Sauced's brother's birthday last spring.

Menu:

Venison tenderloin en croute with oyster mushroom duxelle
Pan-roasted herbed new potatoes (with fresh thyme and marjoram from the garden)
Sauteed mustard greens with orange zest and bacon
Mocha-walnut cake with whipped cream

I made all of these from scratch (except the puff pastry dough for the en croute - seriously, who has the time?), and it was delightful. Sauced's brother Joe is a chef and so I like to bring my A game when he and the fam come over for dinner.

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WindupAtheist
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Badicalthon


Reply #1 on: July 08, 2005, 11:58:16 AM

How do you cook knowing a professional chef is coming over?  That's like pressure and stuff.  I'm surprised you don't just say fuck it and order pizza.   :-D

"You're just a dick who quotes himself in his sig."  --  Schild
"Yeah, it's pretty awesome."  --  Me
WayAbvPar
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Reply #2 on: July 08, 2005, 11:59:57 AM

I started to merge the threads, then lost interest. Only a couple of actual recipes in the original anyway.


As long as you don't advocate putting ketchup in macaroni and cheese or other culinary crimes against humanity, this should be a fun thread. On the bleu cheese vibe, here is a yummy one my wife makes (some in the fridge now, as a matter of fact)-

 1 medium head green cabbage, cored and shredded by hand or in a food processor
 2 medium carrots, shredded
 1/4 cup finely chopped sweet white onion
 1/2 cup cider vinegar
 3 tablespoons sugar
 Salt
 1/2 cup mayonnaise
 1/2 cup sour cream
 1/3 cup crumbled mild blue cheese
 Freshly ground pepper to taste
In a large bowl, place cabbage, carrots and onion. In small saucepan, stir vinegar, sugar and 1 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Pour over cabbage, toss well and let stand 15 minutes.

Drain cabbage well in a colander; return to bowl.

Add mayonnaise, sour cream, blue cheese, and salt and pepper to taste. Toss to mix. Cover and refrigerate at least 30 minutes before serving. Makes 8 to 10 servings.


Not sure if this is her exact recipe, but it looks close. Yummy stuff.

When speaking of the MMOG industry, the glass may be half full, but it's full of urine. HaemishM

Always wear clean underwear because you never know when a Tory Government is going to fuck you.- Ironwood

Who the hell taught you how to write? Fuck, that sentence is like internet transmitted face-attacking knives. Jesus. schild
voodoolily
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Reply #3 on: July 08, 2005, 12:10:15 PM

Cooking is something I've loved to do since I was a kid. I used to pretend I was sick in middle school so I could stay home and practice my souffles. I've been afraid that doing it professionally would ruin my love for it, though. However! Sauced and I are planning to open a B&B when we retire (hopefully at around age 50), like in Happiness of the Katakuris. †cheesy
How do you cook knowing a professional chef is coming over? That's like pressure and stuff. I'm surprised you don't just say fuck it and order pizza. :-D

Joe (the bro) and I love talking shop. We planned the menu for last Christmas and the two of us prepared a five course dinner for 20 people (none of whom I was actually related to). It was hell of fun. We made:

Osso bucco (his recipe)
Gnocchi with white truffle cream sauce (his recipe, my seasoning additions)
Acorn squash stuffed with pecans, apples and pears with orange-bourbon sauce and gorgonzola (my recipe)
Citrus-zested haricots-verts (my recipe)
Hazelnut-maple torte for dessert (his pastry chef buddy hooked us up)

I feel like there was something else, too, but needless to say it was the most awesomest fancy-pants Christmas dinner ever.

(Then, because I'm such a cheapskate, I saved all the veal bones and made veal demi at home later)

Yay, FOOD!

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voodoolily
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Reply #4 on: July 08, 2005, 12:12:06 PM

I love cole slaw, The Jesus. The one my mom made was very similar, but instead of sour cream and blue cheese, she added apples and raisins. (and no onions or carrots). I've since started adding finely minced broccoli to mine.

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Arnold
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Reply #5 on: July 08, 2005, 12:20:25 PM

I love cole slaw, The Jesus. The one my mom made was very similar, but instead of sour cream and blue cheese, she added apples and raisins. (and no onions or carrots). I've since started adding finely minced broccoli to mine.

I'm more of a German cole slaw guy.  Mmmm.  Come to think of it, I like German potato salad better than the mayonaisse stuff too.
Toast
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WWW
Reply #6 on: July 08, 2005, 12:22:36 PM

My initial recipe is very simple, but it gets gourmet results.

1 New York Strip steak (preferrably prime grade)
Coarse Salt and Pepper or other steak seasonings
Butter
Gorgonzola crumbles

Season steak and grill as desired and remove
Have melted butter ready (microwave)
Spoon melted butter over hot steak
Sprinkle gorgonzola crumbles over steak
Serve.

By the way, I think is saw WayAbvPar on Battlefield 2 last night. I play as "OldHurty".

A good idea is a good idea forever.
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Reply #7 on: July 08, 2005, 12:29:13 PM

Was I laying in a pool of my own blood and innards? That is my usual pose.

When speaking of the MMOG industry, the glass may be half full, but it's full of urine. HaemishM

Always wear clean underwear because you never know when a Tory Government is going to fuck you.- Ironwood

Who the hell taught you how to write? Fuck, that sentence is like internet transmitted face-attacking knives. Jesus. schild
voodoolily
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Reply #8 on: July 08, 2005, 12:42:46 PM

I'm more of a German cole slaw guy.† Mmmm.†

You mean sauerkraut? †wink

German potato salad kicks ass. Vinegar ist gut.

Mmm....butter and cheese on red meeeeeaaaat. I made hamburgers the other day that were pretty kickass.

Season ground beef (get the kind with 15% fat, not the uber-lean kind) with kosher salt, fresh cracked pepper and a splash of Worcestershire sauce. Mix and form patties, but do not overwork the meat! Note: I like to make huge burgers, so I use about 1/2-3/4 cup of meat per patty, and then press em' into patties that are about 1/2" thick and 6" across. They always shrink up when you cook 'em anyway.
Fold four pieces of bacon in half lengthwise so they form a "v", and cook until chewy-crispy in a saute pan over med-high heat. Remove and set on paper towels to drain. Do not drain fat from pan.
Add about a cup of sliced mushrooms and about a half cup of minced onions to the bacon fat and cook for about 10-15 minutes until browned. Remove from pan and set aside with bacon.
Cook patties to desired doneness, and on final flip add sliced cheese (med cheddar is good for this)
On bun smear a little mayo, dijon and barbeque sauce on one side, and guacamole on the other. Add lettuce and tomato if you want. Stack the bacon and sauteed mushrooms and onions on the burger and prepare to have your toes curl. This recipe makes two burgers.

If you wanna do this with ground turkey and turkey bacon instead, it's pretty much just as good, but you'll hafta add a little butter for cooking the onions and mushrooms.

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MrHat
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Reply #9 on: July 08, 2005, 01:07:32 PM

Nice. I had something almost identical to that my first 4th BBQ (went to 3).

I do love the burgers cooked at home.  Going to be sad I don't get to take my grill to MD.

I have some recipies for some kick ass Lebanese meals from my mom and grandma, but lack the enthusiasm to post them.
Toast
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WWW
Reply #10 on: July 08, 2005, 01:42:25 PM

Was I laying in a pool of my own blood and innards? That is my usual pose.

Not at the moment I saw you. I was too busy running off to lay down in my own pool of blood. I am cannon fodder on a lot of servers, and I have a slight lifetime death vs. kill deficiti. C 'est la mort.

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WWW
Reply #11 on: July 08, 2005, 01:52:03 PM

I'd post some stuff in here, but I'm more greasy spoon cook than chef. Looks like more gourmet fare than I can stomach :P Actually, I used to cook more complicated stuff when I had a live-in girlfriend, but I stopped that shit years ago. Hopefully the new girl doesn't turn into a bitter nag so she can move in at some point and I can fatten her up.

Example of my crude yumminess: We had some nice kebabs for the 4th. Marinated some chicken chunks in my house dressing (basically an italian dressing with various spicies). Chopped up some bell peppers (red and yellow) and vidalia onions. Skewer them as follows: red pepper/onion/garlic clove/chicken/yellow pepper/onion/garlic clove/chicken/etc. Had steak the same way a week ago.

I'm all about simple recipes that are based on the flavor of the ingredients, without adding too much to the basic flavors. Except maybe heat, love me some jalapeno.

I'm gruntzilla, but I tend to avoid pools of my own blood. Because my body parts are plastered against the wall, nicely out of the gore.

Hanzii
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Reply #12 on: July 08, 2005, 02:52:33 PM

How do you cook knowing a professional chef is coming over?† That's like pressure and stuff.† I'm surprised you don't just say fuck it and order pizza.† †:-D

My brother is a gourmet chef, who used to have a star in the Guide Michelin - I make better pizza than him, and he admits it ;-)
(so the answer to your question is: Find one thing your really good at and keep working on it... I'm also beginning to surpass him in breadmaking)

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WWW
Reply #13 on: July 08, 2005, 03:10:05 PM

What are these "recipes" you speak of?  I'm generally of the "add things till it tastes good" school of cooking.   Rock Out  Of course, most of what I make at home is either salad, soup, or stirfry... making baked goods up as you go along doesn't work quite as well.   undecided  And I've tried to avoid baked goods lately, since I tend to gain weight very quickly when I'm on a baking kick.  Mmm... pie...

"Nice attempted blast about my "drinking".  I do enjoy a nice cuppa, but that is because I am a bon vivant of gregarious nature and cheery disposition." - Ab
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Reply #14 on: July 08, 2005, 03:14:31 PM

Don't make me ask my mother for recipes, or else I'll automatically win.

Even food in expensive restaraunts, both in the US and abroad, don't measure up to what I can get at home for free.

pwnage

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Reply #15 on: July 08, 2005, 04:15:36 PM

Don't make me ask my mother for recipes, or else I'll automatically win.

Even food in expensive restaraunts, both in the US and abroad, don't measure up to what I can get at home for free.

pwnage

Go wave your mother's kitchen-peen somewhere else.
voodoolily
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Reply #16 on: July 08, 2005, 04:23:39 PM

What are these "recipes" you speak of?† I'm generally of the "add things till it tastes good" school of cooking.† †Rock Out† Of course, most of what I make at home is either salad, soup, or stirfry... making baked goods up as you go along doesn't work quite as well.† †undecided† And I've tried to avoid baked goods lately, since I tend to gain weight very quickly when I'm on a baking kick.† Mmm... pie...

Heh, I always wanted to write a cookbook that tells people how to do that (add things til they taste good). I want to call the book Cooking From the Hip (instead of "shooting from the hip", not "how to cook from someone who's hip"). It'd basically teach people how to shop properly and how to taste, basic skills and flavor combos from various culinary regions (e.g. love Chinese? Always have soy sauce, hoisin sauce, sesame oil and garlic in your cupboard, and keep a knob of ginger in your freezer). It would allow the inexperienced chef to basically whip up some magic from whatever dregs they have in their kitchen. And it'd also focus on how being a cheapskate can be the best thing that ever happened to your palate. I've become such a food snob since I started making my own stocks a coupla years ago. It makes a huge difference when you taste jambalaya made with homemade shrimp stock compared to canned chicken broth.

(Edit: one caveat to this, though, is that I always have a freezer bag of shrimp shells or half a roasted chicken carcass in my freezer which takes up a lot of room)

Baking I never got very much into, except for biscuits and cornbread. You're right, no experimentation really possible unless you have a degree in chemistry. I have diddled a little with using different substances to leaven my cornbread (like sour cream instead of buttermilk, but trying to match pH to react with baking soda is hard), with mixed results. Sour cream actually made a very dense, somewhat tough cornbread, which was too bad. I usually just stick with the recipe and add a combo of milk, melted butter and half 'n' half instead of buttermilk (which I never buy). You can try adding wheat germ to your baked goods. Since it's very high in fibre it reduces the number of net carbs in the dish, and makes you feel full longer (so you don't carbo load and crash, which may be one of my favorite hobbies).

Tonight I'm making a big lasagne with hot Italian sausage, a bunch of cheese and veggies (sun dried tomatoes, olives, mushrooms, spinach and brocolli). Rainy weather makes me jones for casseroles like you wouldn't believe.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2005, 04:26:26 PM by voodoolily »

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Trippy
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Reply #17 on: July 08, 2005, 04:31:23 PM

What are these "recipes" you speak of?  I'm generally of the "add things till it tastes good" school of cooking.   Rock Out  Of course, most of what I make at home is either salad, soup, or stirfry... making baked goods up as you go along doesn't work quite as well.   undecided  And I've tried to avoid baked goods lately, since I tend to gain weight very quickly when I'm on a baking kick.  Mmm... pie...
Heh, I always wanted to write a cookbook that tells people how to do that (add things til they taste good). I want to call the book Cooking From the Hip (instead of "shooting from the hip", not "how to cook from someone who's hip"). It'd basically teach people how to shop properly and how to taste, basic skills and flavor combos from various culinary regions (e.g. love Chinese? Always have soy sauce, hoisin sauce, sesame oil and garlic in your cupboard, and keep a knob of ginger in your freezer). It would allow the inexperienced chef to basically whip up some magic from whatever dregs they have in their kitchen. And it'd also focus on how being a cheapskate can be the best thing that ever happened to your palate. I've become such a food snob since I started making my own stocks a coupla years ago. It makes a huge difference when you taste jambalaya made with homemade shrimp stock compared to canned chicken broth.
Somebody already beat you to it (though I don't know if the book is any good):

How to Cook Without a Book : Recipes and Techniques Every Cook Should Know by Heart
Polysorbate80
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Reply #18 on: July 08, 2005, 04:35:14 PM

Chili Verde--

Start with:

* 2-3 pounds of pork (I generally use pork steak)
* 1 entire bulb of garlic, smashed and chopped ('cuz individual cloves are for pussies)
* 1/2 yellow onion, chopped

Cook pork in a large pot over medium-high heat; once fat has cooked off, drain and add garlic and onions. Continue cooking until meat is browned and garlic/onion carmelize.

Turn heat down to medium or medium-low, add 4 1/2 cups of water, and simmer covered for ~40 minutes (or until pork is tender.) †You can do this part in a pressure-cooker if you want it extra-tender, but it takes forever to cook this as it is, and it's kinda overkill.

While that's cooking, combine in a pot or pan:

* 1 jalapeno, finely chopped
* 1 7-oz can diced green chilis
* 1 stick celery, finely chopped
* 6-8 tomatillos, finely chopped (or use the smushy ones from a can, if you can't get fresh)
* 2 anaheim peppers, finely chopped
* juice from one lime, fresh-squeezed
* (optional) some parsley, if the smell of the garlic is freaking you out. †Also cilantro if you like, but goddamn, I hate that stuff...
* spices--this is the hard part, I measure by taste--chili powder, cumin, and oregano. †Heavier on the chili powder, medium on the cumin, lighter on the oregano; that's the closesr I can get. †Experiment, eh?

Add a little oil and cook over low heat for a few minutes.

Dump the veggies into the pot with the meat and simmer covered over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally. †Takes approximately 20-30 minutes to blend nicely, which is about the same time it takes to cook up some refried beans and some yellow or Mexican rice. †I use Vigo's, comes in foil packets, but pick one you like (or go nuts and make your own).

Mix yourself up a burrito with the chili verde, beans, rice and your choice of cheese, and pig out.
voodoolily
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Reply #19 on: July 08, 2005, 04:39:14 PM

Yummers!

Hey, Stray, if you pop in, can you get you're mom's recipe for Pad Thai? I want a real Thai recipe, not the stuff I keep finding on teh intarweb recipe indexes. Tell her to not dumb it down, and give the Thai names of ingredients if necessary (I know what Nuoc Cham is (although that's Vietnamese)). I've got the curries nailed to the floor, and my peanut sauce is pretty good, but I haven't found a good Pad Thai recipe yet.

Edit: Hey, while we're at it, if any of you come from ethnic backgrounds, can you pass any yo mama recipes this way? I'm pretty white bread and the only German thing my grandma ever made was apfel kuchen.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2005, 04:41:21 PM by voodoolily »

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voodoolily
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Finnuh, munnuh, muhfuh, I enjoy creating new written vernacular, s'all.


WWW
Reply #20 on: July 08, 2005, 04:47:24 PM

Somebody already beat you to it (though I don't know if the book is any good):

How to Cook Without a Book : Recipes and Techniques Every Cook Should Know by Heart


Those bastards!

"I shoulda gotten a pah-ent!" (you know which commercial I'm talking about? Hilarious!)

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WayAbvPar
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Reply #21 on: July 08, 2005, 04:48:24 PM

Quote
Tonight I'm making a big lasagne with hot Italian sausage, a bunch of cheese and veggies (sun dried tomatoes, olives, mushrooms, spinach and brocolli). Rainy weather makes me jones for casseroles like you wouldn't believe.

Leave the broccoli out, and I will be down for dinner- sounds fantastic. Why people like to cook broccoli is beyond me. It tastes delicious raw; apply any heat to it at all and it starts to taste and smell as if it just spent 12 hours in Lance Armstrong's Spandex during a vigorous mountain climbing leg. Same with cauliflower- raw is yummy, while cooked it tastes like asscrack casserole.

When speaking of the MMOG industry, the glass may be half full, but it's full of urine. HaemishM

Always wear clean underwear because you never know when a Tory Government is going to fuck you.- Ironwood

Who the hell taught you how to write? Fuck, that sentence is like internet transmitted face-attacking knives. Jesus. schild
voodoolily
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Reply #22 on: July 08, 2005, 04:57:28 PM

Cauliflower takes on amazing depths of sweetness and earthiness if you toss it in a little olive oil and sprinkle it with salt and crushed garlic, then roast it for 30 minutes. Not mushy, not all asscracky. Broccolli I usually leave al dente so it stay bright and crisp.

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Reply #23 on: July 08, 2005, 05:12:34 PM

Why people like to cook broccoli is beyond me. It tastes delicious raw; apply any heat to it at all and it starts to taste and smell as if it just spent 12 hours in Lance Armstrong's Spandex during a vigorous mountain climbing leg.

It actually can be quite good on the grill with a bit of lemon juice.
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Reply #24 on: July 08, 2005, 11:36:05 PM

Jayce
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Reply #25 on: July 09, 2005, 09:57:50 AM

Quote
How to Cook Without a Book : Recipes and Techniques Every Cook Should Know by Heart (Hardcover)
by Pam Anderson

I'm sure she never gets shit about that name.

Witty banter not included.
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Reply #26 on: July 09, 2005, 02:57:42 PM

Just because I am an amazing cook. A recipe from my treasure trove of recipes:† Rock Out


Serves 4-6 Depending

Ingredients Needed:

1/2 pound Mussels (Cleaned and Scrubbed, and if they are open before you use them, throw those away)
1/4 pound Sturdy Fish (Red Snapper, Mullet, Sea Bass)
1/4 pound Calamari (Squid, Stupids - Make sure it is well cleaned)
1/4 pound littleneck clams (In their shells is fine, the same applies here as did to mussels)
2 cups of a fresh tomato sauce (You can make this sauce very simply. Crushed Tomato, 2 cans, crushed fresh garlic, basil, 2 tsps of olive oil heated in a pan just so, and then jarred. This will be the best sauce you have ever had. Stop with the CANNED stuff.)
1 small red onion
1 cup of fresh, chopped tomato
1 1/2 cups of a good white wine (Use only what you would actually drink)
2 tsps Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
Fresh Parsley and 2 cloves of garlic.
1 pound of Linguini


Now comes the fun part.
On MODERATE heat

In a sauce pan, combine olive oil, red onion, red pepper flakes and 2 garlic cloves, minced until they are soft. Once soft, add tomato sauce, wine, crushed tomato until it comes to a boil, then add the sturdy fish and calamari. Cook for two minutes. Add Clams in their shells and Mussels, cover and cook until the clams and mussels open.

Once the Linguini is cooked to Al Dente and drained, put it into a large serving bowl and simply cover pasta with the Zuppa di pesce (Fish soup) and sprinkle fresh parsley.

Enjoy.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2005, 11:54:49 AM by SuperPopTart »

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Reply #27 on: July 10, 2005, 04:36:33 AM

Here's a nice pasta salad to bring to your Summer potlucks. I don't remember which cookbook I got this from.

Pasta with Smoked Salmon and Fresh Dill

Serves 6 - 8

1 pound pasta bow ties (farfalle)
2 cloves garlic
1 red bell pepper, julienned
1 yellow bell pepper, julienned
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 pound smoked salmon, cut in strips (see Other Choices)
1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/3 cup chopped fresh dill
coarsely ground black pepper

Optional Ingredients

2 tablespoons sour cream or heavy cream
2-4 tablespoons capers
1 small red onion, chopped
freshly grated Parmesan cheese


1. Bring a large pot of water to boil. Add pasta and cook until tender. Drain immediately. Transfer pasta to a large mixing bowl.

2. While the pasta is cooking, make the dressing. Place garlic and half of 1 red pepper in a blender or in a food processor fitted with a steel blade; pulse until chunky.

3. Add mustard, vinegar, and lemon juice, and process until combined. Gradually add olive oil and sour cream or heavy cream, if desired.

4. Pour dressing over pasta. Add salmon, peppers, parsley, dill, and, if desired, capers and red onion. Mix together.

5. Add pepper to taste. Top with parmesan, if desired.


Other Choices

This dish is particularly good if you grill the smoked salmon. Grill the salmon on an open flame for about 2 minutes on each side. After grilling, you can wrap salmon in aluminum foil and refrigerate up to a day in advance. Slice the fish into strips just before you're ready to use it.


Cooking Notes

  • I prefer the smoked salmon from "gourmet" grocery stores like Draeger's in the San Francisco Bay Area. The packaged smoked salmon you get from your typical supermarket like Safeway is usually not so good.
  • You don't need to use so much olive oil in the dressing (I usually use 2 tablespoons.) since it coats fine even if you don't make it a real emulsified vinaigrette. You should probably use at least a little since it helps smooth out the taste of the dressing.
  • I don't use any of the optional ingredients since the dish is plenty tasty without them, though someday I might try adding the capers and red onion.
  • I usually leave out the parsley. It doesn't really add any flavor so it's mostly just for color which you already get from the dill.
  • I'm not sure why the receipe only uses the red bell pepper in the dressing. It might be because red pepper flecks show up better on the pasta than yellow pepper flecks. However, I like having equal amounts of the julienned peppers in the dish so I use both in the dressing (1/4 of each).
  • It helps to let the dish sit for a while (like in the refrigerator) before serving to allow the ingredients to blend together; the dressing, especially, mellows out with time.
  • Be careful cutting the smoked salmon -- it's slippery!
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Reply #28 on: July 10, 2005, 10:02:42 AM

Surlyboi's pan-seared tuna with wasabi-ginger glaze

4 6 oz. fresh Ahi tuna steaks, about 3/4-inch thick

vegetable oil

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

8 Tbsp. cold unsalted butter

3 scallions, thinly sliced

1-2 Tbsp. fresh lime juice

3 Tbsp. soy sauce

1-2 Tbsp. prepared wasabi

1-2 Tbsp. grated ginger

Brush tuna steaks on both sides with the oil and season with salt and pepper.

Combine the butter, onion, lime juice, soy sauce, ginger and wasabi in a small pan.

Heat a heavy, nonstick frying pan over high heat. Place the tuna in the pan and sear until crispy and brown. Turn over and sear the other side. Be careful not to overcook the tuna. Itís best rare to medium rare.

While the tuna is cooking, heat the butter mixture over low heat, stirring constantly until smooth and emulsified.

Serve the tuna immediately, drenched with the glaze in a bowl over a bed of soba or udon noodles and a random field green like baby spinach or arugula.

Tuned in, immediately get to watch cringey Ubisoft talking head offering her deepest sympathies to the families impacted by the Orlando shooting while flanked by a man in a giraffe suit and some sort of "horrifically garish neon costumes through the ages" exhibit or something.  We need to stop this fucking planet right now and sort some shit out. -Kail
Bunk
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Posts: 5600

Operating Thetan One


Reply #29 on: July 11, 2005, 08:55:43 AM

A couple winners in here already, going to have to print some of this.

Oysters on the Grill:

Rinse and then throw a bunch of fresh oysters, in the shell, on to the BBQ at med/high heat (depending how hot your grill gets)

Melt butter in a small pot, and sautee some onions, green onions, or scallions in it. Whatever you got.

When the oysters start to crack open, grab em off and shuck open the shell (careful - hot water) Put back on the grill in the half-shell.

Add a splash of the butter mixture, and then one tablespoon of tequila on each. Let it spill over and catch flame. Flambe a few seconds then blow out. Add a splash of Tobasco sauce. Cook based on how slimy you like your oysters, adding more butter and tequilla as needed to keep emfrom drying out.

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Reply #30 on: July 11, 2005, 09:11:56 AM

Ritz and Nutella.

1 can of Nutella
Random number of Ritz crackers

Spread Nutella on Ritz crackers.

Enjoy.

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Rasix
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I am the harbinger of your doom!


Reply #31 on: July 11, 2005, 10:25:43 AM

Just from the Stray bingo/cheese thread:

1 baguette
1 package roquefort
1 or 2 pears
1 package walnuts or pecans (if they're whole, break them up some)

Slice the baguette at an angle producing 1/2" to 1" thick sllices.
Slice the pear thin. Perhaps sprinkle it with lemon juice to prevent it from browning.
Toast each side of the bread for maybe a couple minutes in a broiler.
Place 1 slice of pear on each bread slice.
Top bread slice with crumbled roquefort.
Top bread slice with walnut or pecan crumbles.
Place in broiler until chese is melted or bread top is golden brown.

Serve as an appetizer or as part of the main course.  Tastes like it's about 200x times harder to make than it actually is. 

I don't have them here nor memorized, but if I get a chance I'll post the following recipes: my mom's enchilladas and also a pork taco recipe that kicks all kinda ass.  Both somewhat easy to make.

-Rasix
ClydeJr
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Reply #32 on: July 11, 2005, 01:02:49 PM

I found a great recipe for ribs baked in an oven if you don't have access to a big enough grill to BBQ them properly. I got this from Alton Brown (from the Food Network) and modified the rub slightly. Note: These are not BBQ ribs since BBQ implies smoke.

2 whole slabs pork baby back ribs

Dry Rub:
8 tablespoons light brown sugar, tightly packed
3 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon Tony Chachere's Original Cajun Seasoning
1/2 teaspoon jalapeno seasoning
1/2 teaspoon Old Bay Seasoning
1/2 teaspoon rubbed thyme
1/2 teaspoon onion powder

Braising Liquid:
1 cup white wine
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon honey
2 cloves garlic, chopped

Preheat oven to 250 degrees.

In a bowl, combine all dry ingredients and mix well. Place each slab of baby back ribs on a piece of heavy-duty aluminum foil, shiny side down. (Try to use the extra wide foil. If you use the standard size, you'll probably need to use 2 pieces folded together to form one wide piece. Unfortunately this could lead to leaks...) Sprinkle each side generously with the dry rub. Get all the sides and edges covered well. You don't have to put as much on the underside of the ribs. Pat the dry rub into the meat. Fold the foil up around the ribs and bring the two edges together over the ribs, then fold it over to seal it up. Roll the two ends up to seal that. Refrigerate the ribs for a minimum of 1 hour (I usually refrigerate overnight).

In a microwavable container, combine all ingredients for the braising liquid (Make sure you use good wine: "If you won't drink it, don't cook with it.") Microwave on high for 1 minute.

Place the ribs in the foil on a baking sheet. Open one end of the foil on each slab. You'll want it to look like a big silver mouth bass sitting on the sheet with its mouth open. Pour half of the braising liquid into each foil packet. Tilt the baking sheet in order to equally distribute the braising liquid. Braise the ribs in the oven for 2 1/2 hours. You'll need to open the foil and check the meat to make sure its tender enough.

Take the ribs out of the oven and get a medium saucepot out. Pick up one set of ribs (careful, its hot as hell) and set it on top of the pot so the middle sags a little into the saucepan. Using some kitchen scissors or a knife, make a small slit in the bottom of the foil so the braising liquid drains into the pot. Put the ribs (still in the foil) back on the baking sheet and do the same for the other set of ribs.

Reduce the braising liquid over heat by half or until of a thick syrup consistency. Still on the baking sheet, unwrap the foil to expose the top of the ribs. Brush a good coating of the glaze onto the ribs (don't use all the glaze). Place under the broiler just until the glaze caramelizes lightly. This takes no time at all (less than 30 secs) so watch carefully. Slice each slab into 2 rib bone portions. Place the remaining hot glaze into a bowl and toss the rib portions in the glaze.

Best served with beer and a bib.
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Posts: 18556


Reply #33 on: July 11, 2005, 01:08:35 PM

Quote
I got this from Alton Brown (from the Food Network)

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WWW
Reply #34 on: July 11, 2005, 01:13:16 PM

My favorite non-cookbook book about food:

On Food and Cooking

An amazing book, very interesting.

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