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Author Topic: Space Thread  (Read 81272 times)
Shannow
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Reply #945 on: November 01, 2017, 10:31:02 AM

<insert tony stark robot fire extinguisher gif here>

Someone liked something? Who the fuzzy fuck was this heretic? You don't come to this website and enjoy something. Fuck that. ~ The Walrus
calapine
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Reply #946 on: November 01, 2017, 03:00:02 PM

I'm still reading this stuff!   Heart
this is my favorite thread on the whole site!

 Love Letters Love Letters Love Letters

and yeah, toasty landing which I heard they quickly put out the fire, but how? barge is unmanned I thought, so robots or remote operated fire extinguisher or what?


Remote activated water cannon. Visible in the lower right corner below:



Here again at CCAFS (Cape Canaveral Air Force Station) Landing Zone 1:



Pretty simple design really.

Edit: SpaceX is now aiming for a Falcon Heavy maiden flight NET (No Early Then) 29. December 2017.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2017, 04:33:58 PM by calapine »

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
Count Nerfedalot
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Reply #947 on: November 01, 2017, 09:33:41 PM

The discussion and pictures of transporting rockets a page back got me remembering seeing a Saturn V booster on a barge, so I googled it and sure enough! It happened at least twice. Once back in the 60's:


and again last year!:


and then there was this which I saw several times flying over our school yard in Huntsville growing up:
« Last Edit: November 01, 2017, 09:38:02 PM by Count Nerfedalot »

Yes, I know I'm paranoid, but am I paranoid enough?
calapine
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Reply #948 on: November 02, 2017, 10:51:25 AM

Those Saturn pictures are just wow! Especially the first. Thanks. Heart


I knew the Super Guppy because Airbus bought it from NASA to transport plane parts. They even acquired the rights and built two more that flew until 1998.






And there is the Pregnant Guppy, the predecessor.

After the idea was born (to replace slow barge-travel with planes) the first draft was created in 3 days (!) and presented to von Braun.
The man behind the concept mortgaged his house to finance the plane's conversion. Later von Braun himself test-flew to plane before acceptance.

It opened from behind:

« Last Edit: November 02, 2017, 10:55:00 AM by calapine »

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
Count Nerfedalot
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Reply #949 on: November 02, 2017, 10:20:58 PM

Somewhere I've got a pic of my Dad in the Smithsonian pointing to the SaturnV interstage ring at one of the components he worked on - I'll try to scare it up and link it here when I'm less lazy. He also worked on the Lunar Rover and Skylab as an electrical draftsman, self taught from correspondence courses plus an art degree. Not bad for the son of a subsistence farmer/church caretaker from Texas who literally had no shoes except hand-me-downs with cardboard inner soles for the first 15 years of his life!

Yes, I know I'm paranoid, but am I paranoid enough?
calapine
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Reply #950 on: November 03, 2017, 12:23:37 PM

60 years ago today, Laika became the first dog in space.





Sadly the temperature control did not work adequately and she died after 4-5 hours due to overheating and exhaustion.

If you want to learn more: http://www.russianspaceweb.com/sputnik2.html has an 8-article series, spanning the entire mission from planning to aftermath.

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
calapine
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Reply #951 on: November 03, 2017, 12:50:52 PM

And one video recommendation:

Sentinel-5P prepared for liftoff

A 4K timelapse-video by ESA, featuring some nice shots of Rockot. The launcher consists of two stages of an SS-19 Stilleto ICBM topped of with Breeze-KM 3rd stage, the same engine that is used on the Proton's upper stage.
You can see it's ICBM heritage by the fact that it's launched out of a container. The Rockot rocket (hehe) is going to be phased out next year, so this probably one of the last opportunities to see it launch.

I quite like the Synth soundtrack as well, the artists work is on Soundcloud

Quote from: ESA
This timelapse video shows Sentinel-5P satellite, from final preparations to liftoff on a Rockot launcher, from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in northern Russia, on 13 October 2017.

The Sentinels are a fleet of satellites designed to deliver the wealth of data and imagery that are central to the European Commission’s Copernicus programme.

This unique environmental monitoring programme is providing a step change in the way we view and manage our environment, understand and tackle the effects of climate change and safeguard everyday lives.

Sentinel-5 Precursor – also known as Sentinel-5P – is the first Copernicus mission dedicated to monitoring our atmosphere. The satellite carries the state-of-the-art Tropomi instrument to map a multitude of trace gases such as nitrogen dioxide, ozone, formaldehyde, sulphur dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide and aerosols – all of which affect the air we breathe and therefore our health, and our climate.

With a swath width of 2600 km, it will map the entire planet every day. Information from this new mission will be used through the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service for air quality forecasts and for decision-making.

The mission will also contribute to services such as volcanic ash monitoring for aviation safety and for services that warn of high levels of UV radiation, which can cause skin damage.
In addition, scientists will also use the data to improve our knowledge of important processes in the atmosphere related to the climate and to the formation of holes in the ozone layer.
Sentinel-5P was developed to reduce data gaps between the Envisat satellite – in particular the Sciamachy instrument – and the launch of Sentinel-5, and to complement GOME-2 on MetOp.
In the future, both the geostationary Sentinel-4 and polar-orbiting Sentinel-5 missions will monitor the composition of the atmosphere for Copernicus Atmosphere Services. Both missions will be carried on meteorological satellites operated by Eumetsat.
Until then, the Sentinel-5P mission will play a key role in monitoring and tracking air pollution.

Sentinel-5P is the result of close collaboration between ESA, the European Commission, the Netherlands Space Office, industry, data users and scientists. The mission has been designed and built by a consortium of 30 companies led by Airbus Defence and Space UK and NL.


Edit: Oh and the red smoke is unburned Unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine aka UDMH. Quite toxic. Despite that fact it is (was) popular as rocket propellant due to being hypergolic ie. it spontaneously ignites when coming in contact with it's oxidizer. Reliable ignition was one of the major problems in early rocketry, so this was quite a big advantage. I also can be stored and tanked at room temperature, making a rocket design easier compared to using Liquid Oxygen or any cryogenic components.

Some example of launcher that use UDMH (or a mixture of it): Delta II, Titan IV, Proton, Rockot, Ariane 1 to 4, Long March 2F
« Last Edit: November 03, 2017, 01:13:58 PM by calapine »

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
calapine
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Reply #952 on: November 04, 2017, 03:42:55 AM



Google 'Project Loon', the high altitude balloons that are tested right now providing LTE coverage (by connecting to geostartionary satelites) for Puerto Rico.

Looking at those flightpaths I think an automated Zepplin, able to stay on position, might be a good alternative...

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
Viin
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Reply #953 on: November 04, 2017, 08:46:45 PM

I'm sure right now they are saying "shit we forgot about wind changes!" It would be cool to see mini-drone-blimps with sat to LTE, but probably would have to be huge to have the power to counter winds at a high altitude.

Facebook has a winged high flying drone that might work better to loiter over an area:



https://www.wired.com/2016/07/facebooks-giant-internet-beaming-drone-finally-takes-flight/

However, Iridium's NEXT might just make these a moot point in 5-10 years.

- Viin
calapine
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Reply #954 on: November 15, 2017, 02:22:38 PM

Sorry for not supplying part 2 of the Black Arrow write up. Mostly due to personal reasons.

Here is something low effort, but still nice:

CNES (the French space agency) released a 4K-quality (with sound) drone video of future launchpad of Ariane 6 (due 2020).

Note the giant flame ducts. And regarding the mobile launch tower: Once done it will be 90 meters high, weigh 8500 tons and move at a top speed of 0.36 km/h.  smiley

Addendum: It's basically the reverse concept of Ariane 5 or the Space Shuttle. Instead bringing the launcher on a giant crawler or rails (Ariane 5), once erection and payload integration is done, the building moves away from the launcher.

I honestly haven't looked into why this way is more efficient, but it's listed as one of the reasons the time of Ariane 6 start campaign is cut down to 10 days instead of 30 days of Ariane 5.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 06:23:40 PM by calapine »

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
calapine
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Reply #955 on: November 15, 2017, 06:15:07 PM

And I totally forgot the second video:



Dream Chaser Free Flight Test 2017

Dreamchaser released by helicopter, landing automated. Looks great.

Addendum: If you watch closely there Dreamchaser is wobbling somewhat in the later part of the video. These are actually controlled inputs to test lateral stability of the craft and how well the control system copes in such situations.

Edit2: Just noticed, they even announce them on the radio circuit as "PTIs" (Programmed Test Input)
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 06:28:12 PM by calapine »

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
calapine
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Reply #956 on: November 15, 2017, 06:40:24 PM

Some rambling background info:

There is a good chance that Dreamchaser will fly on European rockets as well. ESA and  Sierra Nevada Cooperation are co-operating. ESA is developing the docking mechanism that Dreamchaser will need once it it's flying COTS cargo the ISS. There is also the DC4EU programme aimed at using the unmanned cargo version of Dreamchaser as a science platform, launched and used by ESA.




Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
Sir T
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Reply #957 on: November 15, 2017, 07:11:15 PM

Wow, you can't even see the strings when they fake it

"I think its pretty troubling when a backyard decoration comes out swinging harder against Nazis than the President of the United States." Stephen Colbert
MahrinSkel
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When she crossed over, she was just a ship. But when she came back... she was bullshit!


Reply #958 on: November 15, 2017, 07:42:14 PM

Addendum: It's basically the reverse concept of Ariane 5 or the Space Shuttle. Instead bringing the launcher on a giant crawler or rails (Ariane 5), once erection and payload integration is done, the building moves away from the launcher.

I honestly haven't looked into why this way is more efficient, but it's listed as one of the reasons the time of Ariane 6 start campaign is cut down to 10 days instead of 30 days of Ariane 5.
I would assume that it is harder to drop a building than a launch stack, and even if you did, it would probably be cheaper.

--Dave

--Jello Biafra: "If evolution is outlawed, only outlaws will evolve."
Count Nerfedalot
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Reply #959 on: November 15, 2017, 07:56:04 PM

Addendum: It's basically the reverse concept of Ariane 5 or the Space Shuttle. Instead bringing the launcher on a giant crawler or rails (Ariane 5), once erection and payload integration is done, the building moves away from the launcher.

I honestly haven't looked into why this way is more efficient, but it's listed as one of the reasons the time of Ariane 6 start campaign is cut down to 10 days instead of 30 days of Ariane 5.
I would assume that it is harder to drop a building than a launch stack, and even if you did, it would probably be cheaper.

--Dave

My guess is to remove the bumping and twisting forces of moving laterally from the stacked rocket.

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calapine
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Reply #960 on: November 18, 2017, 12:45:11 PM

Bob could never cope with Mondays if it weren't for the industrial coffee dispenser:








That's how fuelling a Galileo (satellite navigation system) satellite  looks like. And no, you don't want to drink Hydrazine.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 12:47:59 PM by calapine »

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
calapine
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Reply #961 on: November 19, 2017, 02:44:54 PM

OTD 48 years ago Apollo 12 landed on the Moon. And they did so in walking distance of the Surveyor 3 probe that landed there 2 years earlier....  Just fucking cool. headache



Edit: More context by me: Surveyor 3 landed on on the Moon 2 years before the first humans. The Apollo 12 crew partly dismantled it and brought home it's camera.

It today remains the only probe visited by humans on another world.

« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 05:06:25 PM by calapine »

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Trippy
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Reply #962 on: November 19, 2017, 04:37:40 PM

I did not know that. That is cool.
calapine
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Reply #963 on: November 19, 2017, 05:13:02 PM

I hope I am not spamming.

Apollo 16 - Farting on the Moon:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uuv6TVv0r44


((I love how "yokel" an Astronaut can sound)))

Restoration is a perfectly valid school of magic!
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