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calapine
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Reply #875 on: September 01, 2017, 12:19:51 PM

Hurricane Harvey and the benefit of (Synthetic Aperture) Radar satellites:


This is how the satellites from DigitalGlobe see the disaster zone as of 29th August:

(Background:  DigitalGlobe is based in Denver, Colorado and (to the best of my knowledge) the first private company to provide high-res satellite images. This goes back to Clinton's (Bill not Hillary) Land Remote Sensing Policy Act which opened this field to commercial actors, a field that was up to then the domain of nation states. This forward looking decision is one the reasons American companies are market leaders in this business.)



(If it its not obvious: Too many clouds!)

In comparison a  product of the Copernicus EMS rapid mapping service, showing the areas affected by flooding:




Clouds are not an issue here. Why?

The map is a composite. The static (optical) satellite picture, incidentally 2016 DigitalGlobe data, is overlayed with radar (peeking through the clouds) information by the 4 satellites of COSMO-Skymed (Constellation of small Satellites for Mediterranean basin Observation) from the Italian Space Agency.

Which produces pictures like the one below. The island of Giglio with the capsized Costa Concordia, beached by Captain Schettino, visible on the right:




The process of creating these maps is not automatic yet, which is where Copernicus Earth Observation programme in comes in, of which one part is the Copernicus Emergency Management Service, of which a small part is the rapid mapping service, which can be activated on short notice when disasters hit. AkA "Where does my tax money go?"

The center of Copernicus are the Sentinels. The name of 6 families of satellites (in orbit now / being developed) with different focus (optical, radar, land, air, sea...) and supplemented by "contributing missions" of which COSMO Skymed is one. An informative but admittedly somewhat PR-y video explaining the Sentinels: THE COPERNICUS PROGRAMME
« Last Edit: September 01, 2017, 12:29:19 PM by calapine »

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Reply #876 on: September 01, 2017, 01:15:39 PM

Good to have you back, I have missed your updates in this thread.

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calapine
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Reply #877 on: September 04, 2017, 06:51:48 AM




Freshly baked space ship, straight out of the atmospheric oven.


It doesn't look like it but inside are 3 people, one of which Peggy Whitson who now, with 665 days away from Earth I total,  more time in space than any other woman worldwide and any other American Astronaut.

And Herr the landing itself:

« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 06:55:54 AM by calapine »

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Reply #878 on: September 13, 2017, 09:42:32 AM



If you haven't heard about it yet, Cassini is going to move to planet upstate where it can do science all day. All her probe friends will be there too


 Heartbreak Heartbreak Heartbreak

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Reply #879 on: September 13, 2017, 09:49:37 AM

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Reply #880 on: September 13, 2017, 10:01:54 AM

Wow, I had totally forgotten that it was still up there taking pictures.  Amazing run!


And things have come full circle, as in the very post of this thread, I talked about how SpaceX was doing the second launch ever of the Falcon 9, and that the Air Force's secret space ship had landed by itself for the first time.  Well, turns out last week Space X launched that very same space plane back into space on a Falcon 9.   why so serious?

http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/07/technology/spacex-launch-irma/index.html

We still have no idea what its doing up there.

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calapine
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Reply #881 on: September 14, 2017, 04:15:07 AM

A good overview including lots of stunning images, by NASA:



Link: https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/system/downloadable_items/1079_The_Saturn_System.pdf

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Reply #882 on: September 14, 2017, 06:49:52 AM

And here is SpaceX stage landing blooper reel. Impressive show.

https://youtu.be/bvim4rsNHkQ

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Reply #883 on: September 14, 2017, 07:58:38 AM

And here is SpaceX stage landing blooper reel. Impressive show.

https://youtu.be/bvim4rsNHkQ

Damnit just came here to post that.   awesome, for real

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Reply #884 on: September 14, 2017, 10:56:39 AM

And here is SpaceX stage landing blooper reel. Impressive show.

https://youtu.be/bvim4rsNHkQ

And you beat me to it too.

Calapine on the ball today!

But I still wanted to see video of BulgariaSat's weird landing, although technically not a crash it came pretty close.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2017, 10:59:46 AM by Mandella »
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Reply #885 on: September 15, 2017, 06:32:22 AM

I'm kinda teary: 20 years ago in October I was in front of my monitor, watching Cassini depart from Earth during a NASA live streaming, through an ISDN line and what was a very different World Wide Web, in-between Ultima Online playing sessions (hey, it was released only 20 days or so before :D)  Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly? . What a spectacular mission (and a great achievement by all the parties involved, considering we're talking about technologies developed in the late eighties, after all) this has proven to be  Heart Heart

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Reply #886 on: September 15, 2017, 07:12:17 AM

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Reply #887 on: September 15, 2017, 01:51:42 PM


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Reply #888 on: September 16, 2017, 12:37:21 AM

those are pretty, but I really prefer the more subtle color enhanced pictures, where the saturation and contrast of the existing colors is boosted rather than some of those crazy made-up combos

and Cassini's end made me tear up a little.

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Reply #889 on: September 25, 2017, 11:54:43 AM

*slurps coffee not very gracefully* Soo.... the 68th International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide started today, thus there is going to be a wealth of space news in the next 4 days. The media highlight will surely be Elon Musk new Mars project presentation.

But let's start it slowly with some images from Baikunor, that were shot just early today:













That's just a selection of a 30+ photo slideshow, and I am not even sure I picked most the aesthetically pleasing ones. Here is the rest.

Not much to say about the launch, a commercial communication satellite called AsiaSat 9, but here it is:



Here is it with the dishes unfolded but to see it's true form you need to add the massive solar panels:



I am still impressed by these big birds.  shocked
« Last Edit: September 25, 2017, 11:57:40 AM by calapine »

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Reply #890 on: September 27, 2017, 07:52:43 AM

Some minor news:

Falcon Heavy remains the eternal space Godot. Launch now in 2019 (was: Nov 2018)

JWST is goign to launch in 2019, not October 2018. This isn't due the telescope but the result of a launch window conflict with BepiColombo who which is scheduled at the same month. JWST has more potentially launch windows than BepiColombo, who is flying all the way to Mercury, this it getting first preferences here.

NASA and Roscosmos released a joint statement regarding an ISS-follow on station in lunar orbit.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2017, 08:30:05 AM by calapine »

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Reply #891 on: September 27, 2017, 12:22:53 PM

Two black holes merge 1.8 billion light years away.

And not only could we detect this, we also triangulated the position.

Just wow...  Heart

Here is the full detection paper: GW170814 : A three-detector observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole coalescence


   



« Last Edit: September 27, 2017, 12:28:18 PM by calapine »

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Reply #892 on: September 27, 2017, 12:28:46 PM

GIF showing the difference that adding a 3rd detector makes:



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Reply #893 on: September 27, 2017, 07:52:23 PM

There is something so hard about thinking through this. An event, 1.8 billion years ago. So we detect it now, but...that's kind of like detecting evidence of geological events on Earth 1.8 billion years ago, right? It's a precondition of the Earth we live on today. The thing that is hard about that conceptually for me is: we live on the same Earth with geologies that are 1.8 billion years ago. E.g., the consequence of ancient events is still a constitutive part of our world, it's visible in the landscape of Canada and Australia and Greenland and a few other places. But what's happening now in places that generated those kinds of strong signals of gravitational waves 1.8 billion years ago that is constituting our present cosmological reality?
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Reply #894 on: September 27, 2017, 08:20:54 PM

But what's happening now in places that generated those kinds of strong signals of gravitational waves 1.8 billion years ago that is constituting our present cosmological reality?
The universe is currently expanding at 68 kilometers per second per megaparsec. 1.8 billion light years is 550 megaparsecs, so theoretically the space between us is expanding at 37,000km every second. "But wait," someone says, "wouldn't it have been expanding like that for 1.8 billion years? Wouldn't, indeed, it have been 2.1x1021km closer back then? Since there are only 9.5x1012 km in a light year, wouldn't we have been 220 million light years closer?"

No, I reply, it actually involves calculus because the distance decreases in that time and, worse yet, the cosmological constant isn't constant.

But it's even worse: 1.8 billion light years away, "now" depends upon your relative velocity to such an extent that you can theoretically change by years which events you're simultaneous with by jogging one direction and then the other.

So what do you mean by "our" present cosmological relativity? Yours isn't even the same as mine.

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Reply #895 on: September 27, 2017, 10:02:18 PM

There is something so hard about thinking through this. An event, 1.8 billion years ago. So we detect it now, but...that's kind of like detecting evidence of geological events on Earth 1.8 billion years ago, right? It's a precondition of the Earth we live on today. The thing that is hard about that conceptually for me is: we live on the same Earth with geologies that are 1.8 billion years ago. E.g., the consequence of ancient events is still a constitutive part of our world, it's visible in the landscape of Canada and Australia and Greenland and a few other places. But what's happening now in places that generated those kinds of strong signals of gravitational waves 1.8 billion years ago that is constituting our present cosmological reality?

Think of it like the black holes threw us a ball across a field, except we don't know they threw the ball until it's right on top of us. In the meantime, they walked away and had a sandwich or something. We have no idea what's going on over there, or if they've thrown us another ball, because we cannot see it until it's right in our face.

So yes, what we've detected is what happened in that area of space about 1.8 billion years ago. Anything that happened subsequent to that we will begin to see...though with those kinds of forces, there might not be much left to see for the next billion years or so.

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Reply #896 on: September 28, 2017, 08:35:21 AM

Yeah, the actual space component is something that seems to get overlooked with those kinds of events.  It's 1.8 billion years ago from this "point" in time and 1.8 billion light years away from this "point" in space, too. The universe has changed a lot in 1.8 billion years. And we have no idea how it changed and where/when.

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Reply #897 on: September 28, 2017, 01:21:50 PM

Consider that invertebrate multi-cellular life began on earth 600 million years ago.  These events happened 2x that plus another 300 million years in Earth's life.. plants had barely formed.   My "just tack on 300m years" is a span of time larger than the gulf that separates us from the dinosaurs.

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Reply #898 on: September 28, 2017, 02:11:16 PM

"Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind- bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space."

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calapine
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Reply #899 on: September 28, 2017, 02:24:51 PM

The Proton I talked about earlier launched. Night launch with a lot of cloud cover, so not the most spectacular view.

Anyway, some pictures and a video link:







https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yoy1Vtqb25g

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Reply #900 on: September 29, 2017, 12:58:14 AM

Move over RyanAir ElonAir is in town!  why so serious? Ohhhhh, I see.


Edit: I removed the screenshots, there is now a Youtube video SpaceX Airlines

« Last Edit: September 29, 2017, 03:19:15 AM by calapine »

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Reply #901 on: September 29, 2017, 03:05:41 AM

Context: Elon Musk gave a speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide

He also announced to replace Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy and Dragon with a the new, somwhat smaller BFR concept.

Small here means 9 instead of 12 meter diameter, 106 instead of 122 m height, 31 instead of 21 Raptor engines.


The new BFR is supposed to do everthing. From launching satellites, supplying a moon base to cargo transport to the ISS:



« Last Edit: September 29, 2017, 03:09:09 AM by calapine »

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Reply #902 on: September 29, 2017, 03:33:42 AM

But what's happening now in places that generated those kinds of strong signals of gravitational waves 1.8 billion years ago that is constituting our present cosmological reality?
The universe is currently expanding at 68 kilometers per second per megaparsec. 1.8 billion light years is 550 megaparsecs, so theoretically the space between us is expanding at 37,000km every second. "But wait," someone says, "wouldn't it have been expanding like that for 1.8 billion years? Wouldn't, indeed, it have been 2.1x1021km closer back then? Since there are only 9.5x1012 km in a light year, wouldn't we have been 220 million light years closer?"

No, I reply, it actually involves calculus because the distance decreases in that time and, worse yet, the cosmological constant isn't constant.

But it's even worse: 1.8 billion light years away, "now" depends upon your relative velocity to such an extent that you can theoretically change by years which events you're simultaneous with by jogging one direction and then the other.

So what do you mean by "our" present cosmological relativity? Yours isn't even the same as mine.

If your talking together (IE occupy roughly the same space at the same time while traveling the same speed in the same direction) then its close enough.
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Reply #903 on: September 29, 2017, 03:17:24 PM

Politics about SLS aside this may well be in the Awesome Picture thread:

SLS Core Stage pathfinder (= dummy stage to test procedures) arriving at NASA Michoud


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Reply #904 on: September 30, 2017, 02:22:33 AM

Wow, nice shot!

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Reply #905 on: September 30, 2017, 07:15:39 AM

Yeah, what a great picture.
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Reply #906 on: September 30, 2017, 10:44:03 AM

That's why I come here for my dirty, dirty, space porn.
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Reply #907 on: October 02, 2017, 09:16:12 AM

And just when I was looking for a new background for the work computer!

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Reply #908 on: October 03, 2017, 10:48:20 AM



Falcon Heavy remains the eternal space Godot. Launch now in 2019 (was: Nov 2018)


Officially, it's just bumped to December 2017. (Also, I think you might be living a year ahead, or I'm a year behind -- it is still 2017 right?)

And speaking of living ahead, I think Elon wishes he'd just cancelled the Heavy a while ago. It's already obsolete in his mind, and he's just going to manufacturer a few to satisfy contractual obligations -- he's apparently already tooling up to produce the BFR exclusively.

He is honest to gods going to make rockets as reusable as airplanes, or go broke trying.
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Reply #909 on: October 06, 2017, 01:09:17 PM

Falcon Heavy remains the eternal space Godot. Launch now in 2019 (was: Nov 2018)

Officially, it's just bumped to December 2017. (Also, I think you might be living a year ahead, or I'm a year behind -- it is still 2017 right?)

I was going by unoffical info. And considering that the next CRS flight to the ISS is now scheduled for December it seems to be a pretty safe bet. But yes, I was already one year ahead in my head and meant to say 2018.

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This just an outtake from a longer Roscosmos 360° ISS EVA video. Well worth watching.


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