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f13.net  |  f13.net General Forums  |  General Discussion  |  Topic: Return of the Book Thread 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
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Author Topic: Return of the Book Thread  (Read 573064 times)
Khaldun
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Reply #6440 on: September 28, 2018, 03:18:43 PM

I can't get any further in the third book in that series--I stalled out halfway through. I liked the first two. There's just something about this one that is killing my desire to move on.
Salamok
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Reply #6441 on: September 28, 2018, 03:20:24 PM

I admit I'm a Brandon Sanderson fan boy but I'll also admit that the first Mistborn trilogy wasn't his best.  I've enjoyed everything else he's written though. Even his 1,000 page epics like Way of Kings.

Oathbringer was pretty shoddy, like a deadline was imposed and he had it half written then scrambled to cram his notes in to complete the book.
Reg
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Reply #6442 on: September 28, 2018, 04:31:20 PM

Hmm. I didn't get that feeling at all. It tied up just enough plotholes to keep me from thinking he was turning into Robert Jordan.
Chimpy
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Reply #6443 on: September 28, 2018, 04:48:04 PM

Hmm. I didn't get that feeling at all. It tied up just enough plotholes to keep me from thinking he was turning into Robert Jordan.

I think it is just that the pacing is different, and it is a LOT longer than the other two which are really long. I just finished re-reading all of them last week and I keep picking up on little foreshadowing things in every book that I had missed.

The biggest problem with the third book, I think, is that the book focuses pretty much all of the flashback parts on Dalinar who is the character with the least depth of any of the main characters which causes it to suffer a bit.

'Reality' is the only word in the language that should always be used in quotes.
Salamok
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Reply #6444 on: September 28, 2018, 06:04:09 PM

Hmmm, I just felt like it was a nonlinear version of a Stephenson ending.  Where Stephenson has this linear story arc that just terminates before it reaches the ending, Sanderson had a completed outline that he was fleshing out in parallel then just decided okay let's wrap all these scattered loose ends up cause I am done with this.  The first 2 books were much more polished.
Chimpy
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Reply #6445 on: September 28, 2018, 07:54:05 PM

Hmmm, I just felt like it was a nonlinear version of a Stephenson ending.  Where Stephenson has this linear story arc that just terminates before it reaches the ending, Sanderson had a completed outline that he was fleshing out in parallel then just decided okay let's wrap all these scattered loose ends up cause I am done with this.  The first 2 books were much more polished.

I give a little more latitude to a series book ending abruptly simply because you know there is still a plot line ahead.

I love Stephenson stories but his abrupt "Oh shit, I am only allowed 900 pages and I am on page 875" endings on stand alone books is annoying as shit.

'Reality' is the only word in the language that should always be used in quotes.
Reg
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Reply #6446 on: September 28, 2018, 08:11:58 PM

We should bear in mind that this is intended to be a 10 book epic. He has plenty of pages to tie up loose ends. Sanderson amazes me that he can write books like this as well as fun little stories like Steelheart on the side.
BobtheSomething
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Reply #6447 on: September 28, 2018, 09:49:23 PM

I just read a graphic novel called Wrenchies.  I'm not sure how I would describe it other than that in some places it feels like the Road, in others like Watchmen, with a heavy dose of the Illuminatus! Trilogy.  It's a nonlinear story that follows three different kids, or groups of kids, going through either a personal or a post-apocalyptic crisis.  It's weird.
NowhereMan
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Reply #6448 on: September 29, 2018, 09:17:48 AM

I admit I'm a Brandon Sanderson fan boy but I'll also admit that the first Mistborn trilogy wasn't his best.  I've enjoyed everything else he's written though. Even his 1,000 page epics like Way of Kings.

Hell same! The original Mistborn is fun but the writing is fairly clunky. Sanderson is a really great background/scheme guy i.e. he comes up with really interesting ideas for worlds and good plots but he hasn't been that strong in executing them. I think he's improved massively in that regard.

The Wax and Wayne books are much better written than the original Mistborn trilogy. Same planet but one that has moved on from the medieval era of technology the Lord Ruler imposed into early industrial with an associated 'loss' of power for magic users (spoiler for not particular reason, nothing plot based just world information but in case someone wanted to go into them with no idea)
I'll warn you that Wayne is sometimes pretty hard on the 'lolrandum' style humour. A lot of people really love him but I go between laugh out loud to finding him really grating. In the outline for Mistborn there's meant to be an urban fantasy style trilogy after this.

Also if you (Ironwood) enjoy the world building you can have a crack at Secret Histories afterwards, it focuses on Kelsier initially but does have some spoilers for the Wax and Wayne stuff too. Though I don't think it's the kind of thing you'd like all that much (too much 'look at all this shit that was going on at the same time as all these other things you've already read about').

"Look at my car. Do you think that was bought with the earnest love of geeks?" - HaemishM
RhyssaFireheart
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Reply #6449 on: October 01, 2018, 10:45:23 AM

Hmm. I didn't get that feeling at all. It tied up just enough plotholes to keep me from thinking he was turning into Robert Jordan.

I think it is just that the pacing is different, and it is a LOT longer than the other two which are really long. I just finished re-reading all of them last week and I keep picking up on little foreshadowing things in every book that I had missed.

The biggest problem with the third book, I think, is that the book focuses pretty much all of the flashback parts on Dalinar who is the character with the least depth of any of the main characters which causes it to suffer a bit.

Each book's flashback parts focus on a different character and Sanderson has already said that said character doesn't necessarily need to be alive to be a flashback focus (e.g. Eshonai will supposedly be a flashback char). 

Way of Kings = Kaladin
Words of Radiance = Shallan
Oathbringer = Dalinar

I actually enjoyed his flashbacks for learning more about the character since he did a total 180 from youth to middle-age.  Book 1 was a lot of world-building, too, which made it interesting and book 2 expanded more upon what was going on.  Now we're getting into moving the story along and I can see how that change in pace would feel much slower.  Supposedly, there will be a year time-skip between Oathbringer and book 4, which makes sense IMO because otherwise, the story would be bogged down in little daily stuff.  It would be better to present large events as a fait accompli and if any explanation is needed, it'll be done through flashback or interludes.

lamaros
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Reply #6450 on: October 16, 2018, 08:11:01 AM

Got around to reading The Three Body Problem.

Anyone read the rest of the series, worth pursuing if I generally enjoyed the first?

Expect poison from the standing water.
Khaldun
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Reply #6451 on: October 17, 2018, 08:39:32 AM

I haven't gone on to the rest of the series. I liked Three Body Problem but I also found it slow-going and abstract at times.

Just read a series by Meghan Whalen Turner that I was surprised to find is classed as a YA series, as it feels fairly sophisticated to me--starts with the book The Thief and ends with A Conspiracy of Kings. Has a lot of expected plot twists but the character work is fairly engaging.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2018, 07:15:34 PM by Khaldun »
BobtheSomething
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Reply #6452 on: October 17, 2018, 03:06:05 PM

I'm enjoying a series called The Murderbot Diaries, which also seems to straddle the line between YA and adult sci fi.  The books are quick, amusing reads.
MahrinSkel
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When she crossed over, she was just a ship. But when she came back... she was bullshit!


Reply #6453 on: October 17, 2018, 03:56:12 PM

I endorse Murderbot, fwiw. Quick fun stories that take themselves just seriously enough.

--Dave

--Jello Biafra: "If evolution is outlawed, only outlaws will evolve."
Viin
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Reply #6454 on: October 17, 2018, 08:11:02 PM

A bit expensive for Kindle though. But they are fun reads.

- Viin
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