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Author Topic: Space Thread  (Read 132434 times)
calapine
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Reply #1155 on: July 09, 2018, 03:26:47 PM

Yeah, looks stunning!  Heart



Those things are 40 years old, but to me they look as SF as ever:



One of those launches in ~50 minutes. Just google Progress MS-09 for a livestream.

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Reply #1156 on: July 11, 2018, 08:37:26 AM

China is doing the fancy-trailer-with-film-music-thing now too:

Chinese Space Programme - First half of 2018

Can recommend, it's well done and in english language. And the accomplishments are really quite impressive.

The film was posted on 4th July and is already outdated. Their orbital launch counter now stands it 20, which is ahead of both US (18) and Russia (10)
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 08:39:52 AM by calapine »

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Reply #1157 on: July 17, 2018, 12:13:29 PM

French Guyana nuked!!



Actually just a booster test:



Spaceflight now has a good writeup and a video:

https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/07/16/powerful-new-european-solid-fueled-rocket-motor-aces-first-test-firing/

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calapine
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Reply #1158 on: July 19, 2018, 06:04:06 PM

Video time:

1) Blue Origin New Shephard had it's ninth flight.

Launch - crew capsule abort test at ~90 km - vertical landing - parachute landing of the capsule. All within 20 minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgfTDkU0Z-g


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Reply #1159 on: July 19, 2018, 06:08:34 PM

2) A short documentary showing how the Vega rocket is made. (The one from the booster test two posts up)

8 minutes, pretty intersting as it shows how complex carbon fiber cases are produced, something you don't usually see on TV:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyhVjPaKI7c

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Reply #1160 on: July 20, 2018, 07:32:37 PM

The adaptive optics for the Very Large Telescope are operational now. And wow.

Our 8th planet, Neptune:






« Last Edit: July 20, 2018, 07:37:18 PM by calapine »

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Reply #1161 on: July 20, 2018, 10:42:58 PM

That's pretty awesome.

- Viin
calapine
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Reply #1162 on: July 21, 2018, 08:14:29 AM


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Reply #1163 on: July 21, 2018, 12:26:25 PM

Had a bit of a shitty week feeling down, so this made me smile. I managed to get into an Euronews article with a Porn-pun!  Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly? ACK! DRILLING AND WOMANLINESS


(I linked the video this is about before, but here: ESA Euronews: Inside Italy's Vega launcher factory) Very intersting, much rocket!




Something SpaceX:

Tonight they are having another commercial launch. What's special about this one is that it's going to be the heaviest civilian geostationary sat launched so far; 7070 kg (15600 pounds).
That's a good 170 kg more than current "heavyweight champion"  Terrestar) (launched 2009 on Ariane 5)

« Last Edit: July 21, 2018, 01:40:52 PM by calapine »

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Reply #1164 on: July 22, 2018, 03:48:24 PM

Had a bit of a shitty week feeling down, so this made me smile. I managed to get into an Euronews article with a Porn-pun!  Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly? ACK! DRILLING AND WOMANLINESS


(I linked the video this is about before, but here: ESA Euronews: Inside Italy's Vega launcher factory) Very intersting, much rocket!




Something SpaceX:

Tonight they are having another commercial launch. What's special about this one is that it's going to be the heaviest civilian geostationary sat launched so far; 7070 kg (15600 pounds).
That's a good 170 kg more than current "heavyweight champion"  Terrestar) (launched 2009 on Ariane 5)



And what's extra extra special is that this was the second flight of the Block 5 Falcon series (not the second flight of the same rocket, but the second rocket in the production run) and it made what looked to be a perfect landing on the recovery drone, even after lofting such a heavy bird.

So far so good on the Block 5s. But it's early yet. SpaceX is betting the farm on them being reliable enough to launch 10 times without major refurb, so hopefully this will distract Elon from calling people pedoes and arguing about farting unicorn usage online...
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Reply #1165 on: July 25, 2018, 05:18:51 AM

Ariane 5, the 99th flight, waiting on the pad yesterday:



Isn't that romantic?  Heart

She is going to have quadruplets: Anna,Tara, Samuel and Ellen . The final 4 Galileo navigation satellites bringing the constellation up to 26 and "fully operational" mode.



It's also the last flight of this version using the re-ignatele upper stage and the last with the medium-size fairing.
Both together give that stocky look compared to the other variant. Also note: Yellow cryo arms not attached, as this version uses storable propellants rather than H2/LOX.

Would you like to know more?

« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 05:28:53 AM by calapine »

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Reply #1166 on: July 25, 2018, 10:29:06 AM

And Mars Express found water on Mars. In liquid form, that is.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Mars_Express_detects_liquid_water_hidden_under_planet_s_south_pole

Quote
Radar data collected by ESAís Mars Express point to a pond of liquid water buried under layers of ice and dust in the south polar region of Mars.

Evidence for the Red Planetís watery past is prevalent across its surface in the form of vast dried-out river valley networks and gigantic outflow channels clearly imaged by orbiting spacecraft. Orbiters, together with landers and rovers exploring the martian surface, also discovered minerals that can only form in the presence of liquid water.

 The background is based on an actual image of Mars taken by the spacecraft's high resolution stereo camera.
Mars Express with its two 20 m-long radar booms
But the climate has changed significantly over the course of the planetís 4.6 billion year history and liquid water cannot exist on the surface today, so scientists are looking underground. Early results from the 15-year old Mars Express spacecraft already found that water-ice exists at the planetís poles and is also buried in layers interspersed with dust.

The presence of liquid water at the base of the polar ice caps has long been suspected; after all, from studies on Earth, it is well known that the melting point of water decreases under the pressure of an overlying glacier. Moreover, the presence of salts on Mars could further reduce the melting point of water and keep the water liquid even at below-freezing temperatures.

But until now evidence from the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding instrument, MARSIS, the first radar sounder ever to orbit another planet, remained inconclusive.

It has taken the persistence of scientists working with this subsurface-probing instrument to develop new techniques in order to collect as much high-resolution data as possible to confirm their exciting conclusion.

 
Detecting buried water with radar
Ground-penetrating radar uses the method of sending radar pulses towards the surface and timing how long it takes for them to be reflected back to the spacecraft, and with what strength. The properties of the material that lies between influences the returned signal, which can be used to map the subsurface topography.

The radar investigation shows that south polar region of Mars is made of many layers of ice and dust down to a depth of about 1.5 km in the 200 km-wide area analysed in this study. A particularly bright radar reflection underneath the layered deposits is identified within a 20 km-wide zone.

Analysing the properties of the reflected radar signals and considering the composition of the layered deposits and expected temperature profile below the surface, the scientists interpret the bright feature as an interface between the ice and a stable body of liquid water, which could be laden with salty, saturated sediments. For MARSIS to be able to detect such a patch of water, it would need to be at least several tens of centimetres thick.
<----SNIP ---->

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Reply #1167 on: July 26, 2018, 10:29:38 PM

On a completely different level, here's some retro science for those who want a go on an Apollo Guidance Computer simulator:

http://svtsim.com/moonjs/agc.html

Sometimes irony is pretty ironic.
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Reply #1168 on: August 13, 2018, 01:25:35 PM

In the rockets as art catagory:




Recent Delta IV Heavy launch. That rocket stack has got a real steampunkish feel to it, especially on a night launch.
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Reply #1169 on: August 16, 2018, 01:52:13 PM

This model Space Shuttle really takes the cake. Wow:

Twitter video: https://twitter.com/Stephane_Querry/status/1030153623597199365?s=19

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Reply #1170 on: August 16, 2018, 02:10:18 PM

 Heart

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Reply #1171 on: August 16, 2018, 03:16:06 PM

This model Space Shuttle really takes the cake. Wow:

Twitter video: https://twitter.com/Stephane_Querry/status/1030153623597199365?s=19

Wow. That is awesome. At first i thought it was going to be a challenger joke but the thing actually two stage detaches properly and then glides into a landing!
Mandella
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Reply #1172 on: August 16, 2018, 07:58:22 PM

This model Space Shuttle really takes the cake. Wow:

Twitter video: https://twitter.com/Stephane_Querry/status/1030153623597199365?s=19

Wow. That is one seriously impressive model.

And considering how many micro-launcher startups there are now, I wasn't certain it wasn't going into orbit...

 awesome, for real
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Reply #1173 on: August 16, 2018, 11:19:35 PM

This model Space Shuttle really takes the cake. Wow:

Twitter video: https://twitter.com/Stephane_Querry/status/1030153623597199365?s=19

Crazy cool. Did not expect it to be so realistic, right down to the t/w ratio looking pretty similar and the orientation rotating like the real thing.

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calapine
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Reply #1174 on: August 18, 2018, 05:25:33 PM




I have seen the Space Shuttle before, but this really brings home how big the external tank was. And the SRB...damn.

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Reply #1175 on: August 18, 2018, 08:47:22 PM

One of the projects I worked on in my early 20s sent us to Kennedy for about two months. I got to see a launch (we flew out with like 6 hours notice, didn't sleep at all, to get to see an early morning launch) from right outside Mission Control (I was standing outside the building, then ate breakfast inside -- there was always a big breakfast, some old holdover from the early days). It was fantastic, I still have a frame photo of it -- the flames were so bright it looks like a night launch, not on on a bright morning, in the photo.

I got to see a landing, roll-overs (from OPC to VAB and then from VAB to pad) -- the former was pretty fun, as I was about 60 feet away and it was being literally walked by a bunch of technicians, who themselves were surrounded by a lot of men with a lot of guns (this was less than a year after 9/11). Got to tour the launchpad with a shuttle in place (including sticking me head in to wave at techs). Only thing I missed was a VAB tour, but there were only a few windows where it was available and I couldn't make those. (They were prepping another shuttle for some of it, and I believe stacking up some secret DoD payload on a Delta for most of it).

The launch was a fucking amazing experience. Even miles away from the pad, it was so loud it vibrated your bones. Those clouds of steam rising up around it (from water poured into the blast pit to dampen the launch sound, lest it shake everything apart -- not cool the bricks or anything), the way it seemed to start so slowly it was like it was barely moving....
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Reply #1176 on: August 20, 2018, 07:54:44 AM



Deploying a satellite by throwing it.  Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly?

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Reply #1177 on: August 29, 2018, 12:23:38 AM

The latest episode of Sean Carroll's Mindscape podcast with Mike Brown was pretty good and worth a listen in my opinion (I for one am looking forward to going back to having nine planets in our solar system)
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Reply #1178 on: September 04, 2018, 10:42:53 AM

ESA just released an amazing time lapse of the most recent Dragon departing the station. Seriously, it's eye bleedingly high rez, and looks incredible. Plus my dog liked the music, so there is also that.

https://youtu.be/0_TxRN8OnCA
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Reply #1179 on: September 18, 2018, 11:03:19 AM

Old school...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZIB8vauWSI

An update on the Voyager Probes and some background on their instruments and mission.

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Reply #1180 on: September 19, 2018, 07:34:47 PM

So a fridge opens out beyond the orbit of Pluto and it's brighter than most things radio telescopes are trying to see?

Cloaking field my ass.

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Reply #1181 on: September 19, 2018, 08:10:21 PM

Space Jam 2 has been announced.
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Reply #1182 on: September 22, 2018, 05:23:38 PM

My Keyboard died so:

Japan Asteroid Rover landing - Go look!

https://twitter.com/haya2e_jaxa/status/1043503503279177728


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Reply #1183 on: September 22, 2018, 09:29:19 PM

The hopping bot rovers are all at once wonderful, brilliant, and demented at the same time!

And considering the focus of their research lately, I wouldn't be surprised if the Japanese make the first successful attempt at asteroid mining. And yes, I know about Planetary Resources -- I did say "successful."
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Reply #1184 on: September 25, 2018, 04:19:16 PM

Ariane 5 is having it's 100th launch today

21:52 UTC - or ~35 minutes after this post
Livestream here. I can't promise production value like a SpaceX cast, but neverthess: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3rBUie9Rlw


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Reply #1185 on: September 27, 2018, 08:33:16 PM

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Reply #1186 on: October 11, 2018, 08:10:25 AM

Soyuz launch aborted successfully (crew safe on the ground).

https://spacenews.com/breaking-soyuz-launch-to-iss-aborted-after-booster-failure/

It's possible the ISS will have to be abandoned, as the Soyuz is being grounded and there are no alternative man-rated launchers on deck until the middle of next year.

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Reply #1187 on: October 11, 2018, 08:57:44 AM

I think the Chinese rocket carries a version of the Soyuz, so it could probably handle it. Though with the current state of relations it is hard to say.

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Reply #1188 on: October 11, 2018, 09:05:35 AM

China is not integrated into ISS mission control at all.  It's not just a matter of sending a rocket up.  The US and Russia have joint command centers that run the entire thing, each staffed by citizens of both countries (went on a brewery tour with one of the NASA guys working in Moscow at their command center, heh).  As far as I know (and I could be wrong), it would take a lot longer (And be way more politically sensitive) to integrate them than it would for Russia to investigate and resume flights.

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Reply #1189 on: October 11, 2018, 09:29:13 AM

China is not integrated into ISS mission control at all.  It's not just a matter of sending a rocket up.  The US and Russia have joint command centers that run the entire thing, each staffed by citizens of both countries (went on a brewery tour with one of the NASA guys working in Moscow at their command center, heh).  As far as I know (and I could be wrong), it would take a lot longer (And be way more politically sensitive) to integrate them than it would for Russia to investigate and resume flights.

I know, it was just an option if they needed a man rated launcher before the Russians get their shit together. I donít expect either SpaceX or Boeing to actually have anything flying at all (much less with people) by the end of 2019.

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