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Author Topic: Fish Tanks  (Read 35563 times)
01101010
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Reply #245 on: May 21, 2015, 05:01:36 AM

Yeah, that is a 5gal.

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Reply #246 on: May 25, 2015, 01:36:18 PM

I've been replanting my big tank with various cryptocorynes, and have doubled the powdered fertilizer dose, since everything died back pretty massively when I switched from liquid to powders. The crypts seem to be strong enough to hold up to the clown loaches, who are large enough to cause havoc in there. I can foresee a day soonish when I will have to pass them on...
01101010
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Reply #247 on: June 27, 2015, 08:59:20 PM

Finally found a fish I liked...





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MournelitheCalix
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Reply #248 on: June 28, 2015, 12:03:14 AM

Finally found a fish I liked...






Wow, that is stunning.  I just set up a tank myself going to make a galaxy rasbora/neon tetra planted tank.  So far... battling black beard algae on the plants...*sigh* and thank god for Flourish Excel.

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Reply #249 on: August 25, 2015, 02:59:12 PM

What keeps killing my fucking shrimp Huh

"Mr Soft Owl has Seen Some Shit." - Sun Tzu
01101010
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Reply #250 on: August 25, 2015, 03:12:57 PM

What keeps killing my fucking shrimp Huh

Are the shrimp just dead in the tank or are they munched on?


"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
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Reply #251 on: August 25, 2015, 03:14:28 PM

All I know is it's never lupus.

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Lantyssa
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Reply #252 on: August 25, 2015, 03:43:13 PM

It's it barbies?  Throw one on for me if so.

Hahahaha!  I'm really good at this!
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Reply #253 on: August 25, 2015, 04:07:41 PM

I have killed probably $100 worth of shrimp, and think I have given up trying, to be honest. Even the ghost shrimp don't make it all that long, they start to turn cloudy and keel over after a while.
01101010
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Reply #254 on: August 25, 2015, 05:06:26 PM

That sounds like a water problem, if I am to spitball. You'll have to check the Ph and hardness. Have you guys used anything with copper and maybe have it seeping into your tank now from contaminated filter material? If copper isn't it, it could be acidity or spikes in water parameters.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
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Reply #255 on: August 25, 2015, 05:21:19 PM

To be honest, I think Silver just likes fucking eating them.  Every time, without fail, they come to shedding time and then just keel over dead.

Stupid, Stupid little motherfuckers.  What's worse is that when I found this one, four of the other fish were just fucking tucking in.


"Mr Soft Owl has Seen Some Shit." - Sun Tzu
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Reply #256 on: August 26, 2015, 11:35:25 AM

Shrimp are delicious.  If they're in the same tank, you're probably going to need a ton of shrimp with lots of hides in order to keep a stable population.

When I used to fresh water fish for perch I'd catch a net full of ghost shrimp and use that the entire day.  If there was a fish around, the bait was gone in seconds.

Hahahaha!  I'm really good at this!
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Reply #257 on: August 26, 2015, 11:29:33 PM

The small tank was actually set up as a shrimp tank, fresh and new. Never had any meds in it. When stuff kept dying I did exhaustive water tests.

Since then I have read shrimp need really really slow acclimation.
01101010
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Reply #258 on: August 27, 2015, 08:14:34 AM

The small tank was actually set up as a shrimp tank, fresh and new. Never had any meds in it. When stuff kept dying I did exhaustive water tests.

Since then I have read shrimp need really really slow acclimation.

Amen. Shrimp are very fragile, unlike snails...  Ohhhhh, I see.

Speaking of which, I really need to pick up some Nerite Snails. Off to the fish store!

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Reply #259 on: August 28, 2015, 01:48:20 AM

I think I am giving up on nerites. They keep climbing out, and I have read it is because they are actually brackish water snails that climb in and out by nature. So freshwater tanks are basically guaranteed to shorten lifespan and make them sad snails.
01101010
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Reply #260 on: August 28, 2015, 05:14:01 AM

I think I am giving up on nerites. They keep climbing out, and I have read it is because they are actually brackish water snails that climb in and out by nature. So freshwater tanks are basically guaranteed to shorten lifespan and make them sad snails.

True. But they are only limited to breeding in brackish water. They are fine living in fresh water, though like you point out, little bastards will climb out of a tank when they can.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
01101010
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Reply #261 on: December 29, 2015, 07:15:19 PM

Since I have the week off, decided to rescape. Can't wait to get into a bigger place in June and maybe graduate to a 46g bow front.


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MournelitheCalix
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Reply #262 on: December 31, 2015, 09:14:27 PM


In other news... I switched to powdered fertilizers a few months back and my tanks suck now. The growth in the big tank has fallen way way back and many of the more delicate plants just died. The small tank is festooned with sme sort of hair or thread algae. Looks like a fert imbalance, but it's been hard to figure out. I don't want to go back to the liquids though, they were so freaking expensive...

Raph the hair algae used to be a death sentence for planted tanks.  I had a huge problem with it in mine early on in the setup.  Luckily there are some pretty easy fixes now for that.  What I did was deprived the tank of light for three straight days and treated the tank with Sea Chem Flourish Excel at twice the listed dosage.  At the same time I put into the filters two bags of Phosban.   The result was the algae was pretty devastated.  I cant stress this enough Sea Chem Flourish Excel seems to target the problem Algaes.  After the three day treatment I had two problem plants so I cut the filters and applied using a dropper the flourish excel directly.  I kept the filter off for two hours each day and within two weeks the black hair algae was under control and rapidly vanishing.  I still treat my planted tanks with seachem at a rate of twice a week at the recommended  gallon dosage.  Do yourself a favor, get it and enjoy your tank again.  My neon tetra/ galaxy rasborah tank has never looked better.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2015, 09:16:21 PM by MournelitheCalix »

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Reply #263 on: January 02, 2016, 01:16:09 PM

I've used Excel for years. :)

Current state of the big tank (giant, giant pic)

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Reply #264 on: January 11, 2016, 07:31:24 PM

My daughter won a 10 liter tank 4 months ago that we have 6 neon tetras  and a plant in. I felt bad for them and bought a 90 liter which I'm cycling at the moment. It looks like 2 got hit by fin rot plus have damage to their mouths unfortunately so will treat them as soon as I can move the others out. I think it all came about from adding the live plant (attached to a bit of driftwood). Water parameters are pretty much spot on but when I added the plant I also ended up with a snail infestation - usually I see 7 or 8 which means there are tons more. I've bought Aquaone synthetic plants for the 90 liter and am loath to add a live plant again in case I end up with the same issue.

A few observations on the 10 liter kit:
The filter setup is great.
There was nowhere near enough gravel in the package, something I didn't consider until reading up on setting the 90 liter.
I had a little bit of algae grow but the arrival of snails fixed that.
Tetras need friends - we started with 2 but they were miserable. Something the store didn't tell us.

A few questions:
When I cycle water, I've only been conditioning the new water in buckets that I am about to add. I sit them for 20 minutes after agitating the water/conditioner mix. Should I be conditioning the whole tank? The instructions are a bit obscure on the bottle.

Likewise the biostart that I add weekly: Should I be adding based on the water I replace or the whole tank (I've been doing the latter)?

Is there a trick to ensuring plants/driftwood are free of snails/infection?

Cheers

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Reply #265 on: January 12, 2016, 01:49:14 AM

My daughter won a 10 liter tank 4 months ago that we have 6 neon tetras  and a plant in. I felt bad for them and bought a 90 liter which I'm cycling at the moment. It looks like 2 got hit by fin rot plus have damage to their mouths unfortunately so will treat them as soon as I can move the others out. I think it all came about from adding the live plant (attached to a bit of driftwood). Water parameters are pretty much spot on but when I added the plant I also ended up with a snail infestation - usually I see 7 or 8 which means there are tons more. I've bought Aquaone synthetic plants for the 90 liter and am loath to add a live plant again in case I end up with the same issue.

Bigger tanks tend to have healthier water, period... they are stabler.

Plants tend to only help. It's odd for them to cause an issue like fin rot. They can be a vector for snails and bacteria, of course. You can give them a quick dip in a solution to clean them off -- small percentage of bleach in water, or potassium permanganate, hydrogen peroxide, that sort of thing. There's lots of recipes on the Net.

Quote
There was nowhere near enough gravel in the package, something I didn't consider until reading up on setting the 90 liter.

If you ever do want real plants, you need 3cm or more of gravel or (even better) plant substrate across the whole tank. And watch out for gravel size. Also, different fish like different sizes of gravel... fish with barbels and lots of cleaning the gravel need stuff that isn't sharp, or it can damage the barbels.

Quote
Tetras need friends - we started with 2 but they were miserable. Something the store didn't tell us.

The majority of small aquarium fish (all tetras, all danios) are schooling fish and want friends. 5+ is the usual rule of thumb. The exceptions tend to be solitary fish who should be kept singly, and sometimes that excludes similar species even.

Quote
A few questions:
When I cycle water, I've only been conditioning the new water in buckets that I am about to add. I sit them for 20 minutes after agitating the water/conditioner mix. Should I be conditioning the whole tank? The instructions are a bit obscure on the bottle.

Cycling refers to a process the entire tank goes through. It involves establishing a thriving bacteria colony in the tank and a full biological cycle where that bacteria destroys fish waste and breaks it down, etc. It cannot be done in the buckets. It has to be done in the full tank, because the bacteria bed needs to become established under your gravel and in your filters. Classical cycling involved putting some actual fish in there to generate the waste -- a process that was often fatal to the fish, since establishing a cycle calls for a cloudy water bloom and for potentially toxic rises in various chemicals. These days you can do fishless cycling using stuff like the "biostart" you reference.

The fastest way to cycle your big tank is actually to take the filters and gravel from the little tank and put them in the water in the big tank. Don't wash it first -- the sludge is actually what you want. That will give your big tank a starter colony of bacteria because presumably your little tank is already cycled.

Conditioning water refers to a process whereby you treat new water when it is added to the tank. It can be done to the buckets before addition, or it can be done to the whole tank... a lot depends on what your water is like, but odds are pretty good that you can just add your conditioning chemicals to the tank after you top it off, with no risk. But conditioning the water before putting it in is certainly a best practice.

Quote
Likewise the biostart that I add weekly: Should I be adding based on the water I replace or the whole tank (I've been doing the latter)?

You only need to add biostart until the tank has cycled. Usually you can tell this by watching the water test results, or waiting until the cloudy water is past.

Quote
Is there a trick to ensuring plants/driftwood are free of snails/infection?

The aforementioned dips. For driftwood, some people boil it.

Good luck!
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Reply #266 on: January 12, 2016, 03:08:27 AM

Thanks. That makes a lot of sense.


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Reply #267 on: January 27, 2016, 01:32:41 AM



Took down the little tank today and yesterday and redid it. In the process, also moved all the fish and plants that were in there over to the big tank. I am probably about to experience some epic cryptocoryne melt -- they don't like to be moved. On the other hand, if they come back -- which they usually do -- I should get some nice color variety in the tank.

This means new fish stock includes five ember tetras, three panda cories, and three otocinclus on top of the otos that were already in there.

I need to rehome the clown loaches, they are getting way too big for the tank. Maybe swap the SAEs for small ones too.
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Reply #268 on: January 29, 2016, 01:32:13 PM

This forum has a little something for everyone doesn't it? I've learned more from binge reading this thread than all the pet store books I've wasted money on.

So anyway, I've got an old 40 gallon bowfront that just had it's last fish die of old age a few weeks ago. I plan to move it to another room and rehabilitate it.

Things I've learned from this thread: 1) Don't just dump out all the water and start new as that will destroy the needed bacteria, but, 2) since the tank has been running over thirteen years and many fish generations it's almost certainly got "old tank syndrome" so I need to get rid of *most* of it. Do you guys think that just draining it down to the gravel would be all right, then refilling? (Well water, so no chlorine problems, but maybe a little hard.)

Also, my wife is "suggesting" we switch over to cold water goldfish. Thoughts? Is that really simpler to maintain, and would I need to completely restart the tank?

No live plants currently, except algae, and looks like I need to replace the hood completely. Wouldn't mind any suggestions for good fish for a 40 gallon, that don't mind plastic.
01101010
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Reply #269 on: January 29, 2016, 02:03:16 PM

This forum has a little something for everyone doesn't it? I've learned more from binge reading this thread than all the pet store books I've wasted money on.

So anyway, I've got an old 40 gallon bowfront that just had it's last fish die of old age a few weeks ago. I plan to move it to another room and rehabilitate it.

Things I've learned from this thread: 1) Don't just dump out all the water and start new as that will destroy the needed bacteria, but, 2) since the tank has been running over thirteen years and many fish generations it's almost certainly got "old tank syndrome" so I need to get rid of *most* of it. Do you guys think that just draining it down to the gravel would be all right, then refilling? (Well water, so no chlorine problems, but maybe a little hard.)

Also, my wife is "suggesting" we switch over to cold water goldfish. Thoughts? Is that really simpler to maintain, and would I need to completely restart the tank?

No live plants currently, except algae, and looks like I need to replace the hood completely. Wouldn't mind any suggestions for good fish for a 40 gallon, that don't mind plastic.

Beneficial bacteria aren't really in the water column so feel free to drain all of it (some is, but not anything to worry about). The main brunt of the bacteria is attached to everything in the water and if you are just doing a 100% water change, your parameters aren't going to spike...though they will fluctuate a bit. If you are thinking about a complete rescape, then drain the tank water into separate buckets and keep the tank stuff (plants, substrate, fliter materials, driftwood, rocks, etc.) in there until you fit it all back in - then refill with 100% fresh water.

If you are thinking about replacing substrate and most of the 'stuff,' then you might want to use the tank water you have to wash off a few things and keep that as your seed water. It won't last long so make sure you get it in the tank or put the new stuff in that water so the bacteria have a chance to colonize on the new stuff.

Goldfish are messy ass fish and I'd argue will take a bit more to maintain given their "output." For a 40gal bow front (I am currently looking around for a 46g bow), you can do a lot. It really does depend on your tastes. Angels are pretty easy to maintain, but IHMO, I think they are ugly fish (But I am a huge discus fan so YMMV). I don't think may fish care if the tank stuff is plastic. They may nip at it and determine it is not food and ignore it and use it mainly for cover.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Arinon
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Reply #270 on: January 29, 2016, 03:23:56 PM

Goldfish are super messy, take up a lot of room, and are boring as hell, but to each their own!  Lots of danios, barbs, catfish, and some loaches do just fine in unheated if your room temp is stable.

I'm no expert but if a tank has been running for a few weeks with no fish and no feeding wouldn't the cycle basically be broken already?  When seeding a new tank I just make sure the gunk from the filter and any migrating decorations don't dry out.  You still need to watch parameters if you're going to dump a bunch of fish in at once though.  I find it easier to just add fish slowly (over many weeks) rather than monkey around with testing.
01101010
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Reply #271 on: January 29, 2016, 04:33:56 PM

I'm no expert but if a tank has been running for a few weeks with no fish and no feeding wouldn't the cycle basically be broken already?

Expert level point though - good catch. If it hasn't been too long, you could just throw some fish food in there to maintain whatever bacteria is left.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
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Reply #272 on: January 29, 2016, 09:28:49 PM

Pretty sure I've still got active bacteria -- the tank was a bit overdue for a good cleaning when the last fish died.

Okay, that sounded bad. But that fish, just some ordinary yellow fish less then three inches long, was the last fish in the tank because he killed everything else I put in the tank, including fish twice his size. Then, he refused to die. It's been like a year with only this one murderfish in the tank. I called him the King in Yellow. I couldn't bring myself to directly kill him, but yeah maybe I let the time drag on a bit between changings...

So anyway, I'm keeping the air and filters going, and occasionally restocking the organics. Hopefully I'll get some more, less murderous, fish, in there this weekend, after I've cleaned everything up.

I'm thinking Molly's and maybe a Plecostomus.

And I agree on both the goldfish and the angelfish. I've always known angelfish to be super territorial themselves and hard to keep with others, although apparently that is a running problem with any tank I have...

Oh, what do you guys think about LED hood lights? More expensive I know, but I figure it might be worth it to never have to fool with the tubes anymore.
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Reply #273 on: January 29, 2016, 10:18:27 PM

All my lighting is LED now.  Smaller, lighter, cooler, cheaper to operate, and less hassle.

Would totally recommend them.  I only do low light plants (badly) so I can't speak to that side of things first hand, but my understanding is that the newer LED fixtures will grow whatever you want.

Requisite Pleco warning:  Make sure you don't get one that grows into a monster.  Bristlenose, Rubberlip, and I think Clown all stay small enough for a 3/4 foot tank.  I have two 9 year old bristlenose in separate tanks.  They took a year or two to get up around 5 inches and have basically stayed that size.  Great fish, they get along with everything.
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Reply #274 on: January 29, 2016, 11:47:00 PM

And watch out, because people can and will sell you a "rubberlip" that turns out to be a common. :P A lot o plecos can be hard to tell apart.

Mollies are basically swimming stomachs. Also, they are livebearers. If you have a male and a female, you will soon have a hundred. And then they will eat their babies.

I use a Finnex Planted+ fixture on my small tank and am very happy with it.

I just finished the rescape of that small tank btw. Currently five red cherry shrimp and six neons (lost one shrimp... that I know of).



Crypt parva in foreground, with one centrally placed crypt lutea in the center back. The flattish rock is curved, so there's actually a cave under there. I figured shrimp would like that. An anubias behind it, with the root structure right there, so there's shrimp hidey spots in it. Tryng dwarf hairgrass again, on the right side. There's crypts planted in the midst of that too, and also on the left (lutea and wendtii). That's a sword on the ridge above it. Then some rotala and a couple random stems of other stuff. I also tossed a baby moneywort and baby water sprite in as floaters, might plant them on the back.

I also just put up tank pics of the whole history of both tanks, so you can see the rise and fall and rise (and in the case of the small one, fall and fall and fall).

http://www.raphkoster.com/fish-tanks/
01101010
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Reply #275 on: January 30, 2016, 06:19:05 AM

LEDs are the way to go definitely. Just make sure to keep an eye on them, I had a bad strip which started flickering and it drove me mad.

Plecos are boring fish IMHO. I'd move to a small school of corys (4-5). Panda corys can be quite cute and they are great tank mates.

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Reply #276 on: January 30, 2016, 12:25:51 PM

Always nice to see pics of Raph's tanks. They are certainly inspiring -- I might have to try for live plants again. A bed of green with smaller brightly colored fish looks to make a real attractive aquarium. And yes, I am trolling for suggestions.   Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly?

Plecos: Yeah, they are kinda boring, but I do like their prehistoric look. I have been burned on the "little pleco that turns into a monster pleco" gambit before. That thing was getting big enough that I was considering eating him. I'm pretty sure he had the same thoughts about me...

Nobody around here even sells shrimp anymore. I had some at one time, but never could keep them going for much more than a few months at a time.

Favorite fish ever was one of those knife fish. Also started off small and though not social didn't mess with the other fish too much. But in the last year of his life he turned super aggressive, and once again I had a one fish tank. He even killed the current plecostomus.

That's the sort of thing I'm trying to avoid with the new batch. I'd rather have a bunch of smaller schooling fish that eat their young than one ultra dominant piscoid that eats *everybody.*

Glad to hear support for the LEDs. I've already converted all the house lighting to LED, now it's the aquarium's turn.
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Reply #277 on: January 30, 2016, 08:02:27 PM

Always nice to see pics of Raph's tanks. They are certainly inspiring -- I might have to try for live plants again. A bed of green with smaller brightly colored fish looks to make a real attractive aquarium. And yes, I am trolling for suggestions.   Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly?

Yeah, I am at the point where I am kinda over big showpiece fish. 13 inch pleco, 7 inch clown loach, 7 inch T barb... heck, even the school of barbs we have. They're destructive of the plants, often hassle other fish, and even though they can have great personalities (clown loaches are really nifty that way) you can get much the same from smaller fish. And then you can have more.

Though I wouldn't mind having another rainbow shark. So... maybe ONE showpiece fish. :)

The secret to plants, it turns out, is to give them fertilizer. :P

Quote
Nobody around here even sells shrimp anymore. I had some at one time, but never could keep them going for much more than a few months at a time.

Me neither, but it feels like I am off to an OK start this time. We'll see! FWIW, same site I linked above sells them for shipment,


Quote
That's the sort of thing I'm trying to avoid with the new batch. I'd rather have a bunch of smaller schooling fish that eat their young than one ultra dominant piscoid that eats *everybody.*

This site has a great list of small schooling fish: https://www.bobstropicalplants.com/shop/en/29-schooling-fish


Quote
Glad to hear support for the LEDs. I've already converted all the house lighting to LED, now it's the aquarium's turn.

I'm eyeing the Finnex 24/7 personally. Local fish store has the 48 inch for $123, which is a fair bit cheaper than online prices I have seen. I'd need two to match the T5HO setup I have on the big tank though.

Edit: fixing broken quote
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 11:39:24 PM by Raph »
01101010
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Reply #278 on: January 30, 2016, 09:26:16 PM

Spotted Raphael works for the prehistoric look and the armored catfish look... and they live quite a while. I can recommend those...however, they are not a social fish and will basically live in a cave and only come out to feed... but they are pretty cool - if you can find them.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
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Reply #279 on: January 31, 2016, 09:15:14 AM

Harlequin Rasboras and Rummynose Tetras are both nice fish that fit the shoaling, non-aggressive, plant safe criteria.  I also really like White Cloud Mountain minnows but they might be a bit bland for some.

Raphael cats look amazing, never pulled the trigger on one because I heard they can be predatory.  No first hand experience with them though.  The bottom of my tanks are always filled with loaches, which are easily the best type of fish ever!
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