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f13.net  |  f13.net General Forums  |  Game Design/Development  |  Topic: Art of Fighting 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
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glennshin
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on: February 10, 2009, 05:44:30 PM

Hey guys,

I'm trying to start a discussion about what rules are necessary to re-create the art of fighting.

So everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler. I'm thinking that I can design the entire fighting system based off of expanding & contracting bubbles.
I'm just kinda tired of how static and clunky "fighting" games feel. Even my favorite fighting games (the Street Fighter incarnations, Soul Calibur Tekken etc.) just don't feel right. I want something that has the dynamic possibilities of the highest levels of training. Games that came closest in feeling were Top Spin (yup a tennis game) and the Warriors (multiple man attack & brutality).

I can talk with my dojo friends and other fight fanatics/UFC fans (only barely), but they usually have no idea about anything technical.
I can talk w/ my game designer buddies all day long about design, but none of them have any clue on what happens before/during/after a fight.

 I'm hoping that some on this board are computer nerds & also grew up with martial arts.

I need to see what principles can actually be programmed, and which would be too esoteric to implement.

Here's as far as i understand fighting.

Some stats or core game elements I'm thinking of.

Blending (with attack)- accounts for timing, direction of energy (proper vectors) & distance

Extension - accounts for structure (self), proper individual energy flow & Connection (have no idea how to recreate this in-game)
I imagine this could also cover your "space" or the bubble that you have direct physical control over.

Footwork - accounts for range of movement, possibilities of movement, Weaknesses & Strength in stance.


Strength - I know this goes against what we are taught, but there is a certain level at which it simply overwhelms less than perfect technique. (very easy to put into a game)

There are essentially only 2 forms of attack:
Linear
Circular 

Once I straighten this out, I will try my hand at programming a prototype.


Thanks guys,
-Glenn
UnSub
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Reply #1 on: February 11, 2009, 02:46:37 AM

There's a turn-based fighting game where you have to manipulate parts individually to attack. Can someone else help me with the name of it? That might provide some ideas.

schild
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Reply #2 on: February 11, 2009, 11:08:54 AM

There's a turn-based fighting game where you have to manipulate parts individually to attack. Can someone else help me with the name of it? That might provide some ideas.

Toribash.
glennshin
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Reply #3 on: February 12, 2009, 03:50:56 PM

checked out Toribash. Definitely dynamic. At the same time though, not intuitive at all.  The learning curve was about 30 min - hour.
Fun though once you start ripping people's heads off.
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