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Cyrrex
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Reply #38080 on: December 07, 2018, 12:17:36 AM

Regular Excel is better than Excel Online for basically anything that isn't a collaborative office birthday cake list.  Or for occasionally checking shit via OneDrive on your iPhone or whatever.  I like the whole idea behind the online versions, but for now it just isn't where it needs to be.


Never, ever assume someone that short and fat has their shit together. - Schild
Ironwood
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Reply #38081 on: December 07, 2018, 01:31:07 AM

Online Excel is for when you're on the go or, frankly, you want concurrent use without the fucking headache.

The idea of proper accountants or people who want to DO shit using Excel Online is just bad marketing.  Don't believe it.

"Mr Soft Owl has Seen Some Shit." - Sun Tzu
Cyrrex
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Reply #38082 on: December 07, 2018, 01:48:31 AM

No, I don't believe it.  But unfortunately, with O365 and everything going in that direction, we seem to ultimately have little choice.

And it isn't just accountants.  I am not one myself (have done financial controlling in the past), but I do plenty in Excel that requires the superior version.  Accountants are just the worst case scenario (heh, in more ways than one amirite).

Never, ever assume someone that short and fat has their shit together. - Schild
Ironwood
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Reply #38083 on: December 07, 2018, 02:21:07 AM

I said not so;  and yet, the darkness came.

"Mr Soft Owl has Seen Some Shit." - Sun Tzu
Yegolev
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2/10 WOULD NOT INGEST


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Reply #38084 on: December 07, 2018, 12:10:42 PM

Meteorologists use Excel. My own uses are rather simple and only somewhat outstrip a CSV's abilities in some cases, like my vacation calendar.

Since we are talking about useless Microsoft shit, I have started experimenting with AWS Workspaces to replace a Lenovo laptop that one of our guys used to generate radar maps. So, I learned PCoIP is a thing. I really need to hire someone to do this Windows work before people find out I'm touching it.

Why am I homeless?  Why do all you motherfuckers need homes is the real question.
They called it The Prayer, its answer was law
Mommy come back 'cause the water's all gone
Cyrrex
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Reply #38085 on: December 13, 2018, 04:50:41 AM

Apparently, there are still men in this world who, while using a unisex, public toilet at work:

Leave the seat down whilst standing and peeing.
Pee on the seat.
Leave the pee on said seat.

I have seen this numerous times over the past few weeks.  Could be it is just one dude.  The Phantom Tinkler.

I mean, WTF?  What is going through your brain, aside from absolutely not much?


Never, ever assume someone that short and fat has their shit together. - Schild
01101010
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You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #38086 on: December 13, 2018, 07:35:14 AM

Germ-a-phobe? Touching a toiletseat leads to meltdowns with some of them "Monk" types.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Sky
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I love my TV an' hug my TV an' call it 'George'.


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Reply #38087 on: December 13, 2018, 10:53:28 AM

We've got a guy who always puts the lid down in our unisex shared staff bathroom. What the fuck dude.

Selby
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Reply #38088 on: December 13, 2018, 01:40:27 PM

We've got a guy who always puts the lid down in our unisex shared staff bathroom. What the fuck dude.
His mom raised him right! My mom trained our dad to always put the seat down.

If you want the seat up and are too paranoid to touch it, use your foot. Peeing on the seat is unacceptable, for both genders!
Samwise
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sentient yeast infection


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Reply #38089 on: December 13, 2018, 01:53:51 PM


"Nice attempted blast about my "drinking".  I do enjoy a nice cuppa, but that is because I am a bon vivant of gregarious nature and cheery disposition." - Ab
ezrast
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Reply #38090 on: December 13, 2018, 02:14:28 PM

Lid down keeps shit particulate from being launched into the air every time you flush. It's not just there for looks.
01101010
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You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #38091 on: December 13, 2018, 03:47:53 PM

Lid down keeps shit particulate from being launched into the air every time you flush. It's not just there for looks.

This. Although I started really making sure I shut the lid when I got my kittens. No way was I going to have that tragedy happen in my apt. Doing it ever since.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Selby
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Reply #38092 on: December 13, 2018, 05:20:17 PM

RhyssaFireheart
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Reply #38093 on: December 14, 2018, 09:23:15 AM


You've apparently never been in a women's bathroom.  I'm certainly not a germaphobe of any kind and I actually hate those paper seat covers, but I will take a wad of toilet paper and wipe down the seat here at work because I've sat on a wet seat a few too many times.  There are women who hover over the toilet to avoid sitting on the seat, some I swear drip dry and don't wipe, and a few who don't wash their hands.  It's just gross and I refuse to credit different cultural norms for that at all.

rattran
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Unreasonable


Reply #38094 on: December 14, 2018, 09:33:45 AM

Those paper seat covers do nothing, and were designed/marketed by a dentist.
01101010
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You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #38095 on: December 14, 2018, 11:17:14 AM

Fuck rhinovirus infections. I hate cold season.  Ohhhhh, I see.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Fraeg
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Mad skills with the rod.


Reply #38096 on: December 14, 2018, 04:00:56 PM

I am going to attempt to cook lemon bars tonight to bring to a dinner party I am going to on Saturday night.   This will be the first dessert thingy I have ever made/baked.  why so serious? DRILLING AND MANLINESS DRILLING AND MANLINESS

Wish me luck, and yes I know as far as baking goes I am setting the bar pretty low.  Looking at the ingredients list I have to buy sugar and flower... not sure I have ever bought those before, probably rye flower at some point but like a bag of sugar? I doubt I have ever purchased that before.

"There is dignity and deep satisfaction in facing life and death without the comfort of heaven or the fear of hell and in sailing toward the great abyss with a smile."
Trippy
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Reply #38097 on: December 14, 2018, 04:05:31 PM

I wouldn't recommend you try to make those with flower.
Samwise
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sentient yeast infection


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Reply #38098 on: December 14, 2018, 04:23:21 PM

Don't let Trippy discourage you.  Your local florist will be able to get you set up with everything you need for this recipe.

"Nice attempted blast about my "drinking".  I do enjoy a nice cuppa, but that is because I am a bon vivant of gregarious nature and cheery disposition." - Ab
Morat20
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Reply #38099 on: December 14, 2018, 05:05:56 PM

Four years of allergy shots, three of them at full dosage, and I had my first reaction to a shot today. (I was one dose short of the monthly maintenance does too, dammit).

0/10 would not recommend that level of allergic reaction.

10/10, would recommend this allergy clinic as the place to have one. (I mean it's part of their job, but still). I had just gotten the shots, stupidly tempted fate by talking about how all it does it make me want to take a nap for a bit, and was paying for a year's worth of vials (they drop you down and move you back up to your monthly dosage on new vials), and was thinking "I feel weird". The nurse working reception looked at me and asked if I felt okay. I said I did not.

60 seconds later I was sitting in a chair in an exam room with the doctor taking my pulse and BP, while telling the nurse what he needed. 45 seconds after that I was flat on my back, legs elevated, in another exam room as they tried to get an IV in. The next twenty minutes sucked.

All you feel is that you can breath, but it's not enough. Your whole head hurts. There's a rolling, intense cramp around your heart that feels like a heart attack, like a fist squeezing it. I thought I was having a heart attack triggered by the damn shock.  Your head hurts, you can feel your throat swelling, there's nausea and the idea of throwing up when you already cant' seem to breathe is terrifying.

And get this? Apparently it can get worse Like whatever scale they use, I was not at the top level. I was maybe the top 30%.

They got it under control really fast, it started getting better within about 10 minutes of the first injection (and then a lot better after the second epi injection)  and the lung treatment and the steroids, and anti-histamines and they were shoving into me. But that was fucking terrifying.

Apparently now I'll just go twice a month for a half dose. Still worth it.
Hawkbit
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Reply #38100 on: December 14, 2018, 05:08:54 PM

Thanks for not dying on us. Glad youíre better, thatís scary stuff.
schild
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Reply #38101 on: December 14, 2018, 05:42:32 PM

Four years of allergy shots, three of them at full dosage, and I had my first reaction to a shot today. (I was one dose short of the monthly maintenance does too, dammit).

0/10 would not recommend that level of allergic reaction.

10/10, would recommend this allergy clinic as the place to have one. (I mean it's part of their job, but still). I had just gotten the shots, stupidly tempted fate by talking about how all it does it make me want to take a nap for a bit, and was paying for a year's worth of vials (they drop you down and move you back up to your monthly dosage on new vials), and was thinking "I feel weird". The nurse working reception looked at me and asked if I felt okay. I said I did not.

60 seconds later I was sitting in a chair in an exam room with the doctor taking my pulse and BP, while telling the nurse what he needed. 45 seconds after that I was flat on my back, legs elevated, in another exam room as they tried to get an IV in. The next twenty minutes sucked.

All you feel is that you can breath, but it's not enough. Your whole head hurts. There's a rolling, intense cramp around your heart that feels like a heart attack, like a fist squeezing it. I thought I was having a heart attack triggered by the damn shock.  Your head hurts, you can feel your throat swelling, there's nausea and the idea of throwing up when you already cant' seem to breathe is terrifying.

And get this? Apparently it can get worse Like whatever scale they use, I was not at the top level. I was maybe the top 30%.

They got it under control really fast, it started getting better within about 10 minutes of the first injection (and then a lot better after the second epi injection)  and the lung treatment and the steroids, and anti-histamines and they were shoving into me. But that was fucking terrifying.

Apparently now I'll just go twice a month for a half dose. Still worth it.

Lied on my back in an ER two years ago, chills, couldn't really move but not paralyzed, doc looked at me and said "have you ever been tubed? Because we might need to" and I said "the fuck you will." Passed out from IV benedryl for three hours and started with a specialist. Narrowed it down to one of the ingredients in Excedrin migraine. Which one? Never going to try and find out. Haven't had a reaction for two years.
Morat20
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Reply #38102 on: December 14, 2018, 06:40:54 PM

Thanks for not dying on us. Glad youíre better, thatís scary stuff.
It wasn't that bad in reality. It just felt like it. Doc said there's a 1 to 5 scale and I was high 3 or maybe 4. 5 seems to be "we insert a tube, possibly through your trachea if your throat is that bad, en route via ambulance".

There's a reason they make you wait 20 minutes or half an hour after getting those shots, and they were all set up for a reaction. Biggest problem was getting an IV in. I guess super low blood pressure makes doing it harder? Nurse couldn't start it, doctor slid in and it was like a magic trick.

I've got a whole new sympathy for anyone allergic to peanuts or bee stings. They go straight from normal to at least where I was, just out of nowhere. At least I was standing in a clinic, about to wait my 20 minutes, with everyone ready and prepared for exactly that problem.
MahrinSkel
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When she crossed over, she was just a ship. But when she came back... she was bullshit!


Reply #38103 on: December 14, 2018, 09:48:28 PM

That is not a *bad* conversation with a doctor. An actually bad conversation is when they ask you to fill out the organ donor paperwork before surgery...and you make the mistake of asking what parts they can use...and then you think about the bits that aren't on the list, and how you're stuck with them if you don't die.

--Dave (especially when it includes the sentence "of course your liver is a complete write off")

--Jello Biafra: "If evolution is outlawed, only outlaws will evolve."
Morat20
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Reply #38104 on: December 14, 2018, 10:10:08 PM

That is not a *bad* conversation with a doctor. An actually bad conversation is when they ask you to fill out the organ donor paperwork before surgery...and you make the mistake of asking what parts they can use...and then you think about the bits that aren't on the list, and how you're stuck with them if you don't die.

--Dave (especially when it includes the sentence "of course your liver is a complete write off")
When I was perhaps 14, I had to get a head MRI. That was after the CAT scan and stuff. Since I was 14, I was terrified I had a tumor (despite the fact that the CAT scan would have probably gotten that, but it was the 90s and I was 14, and I was not real happy about being in the ER and having every other doctor sound surprised that the drug test had turned up clean. Yes, I get that lovers of certain types of recreational drugs would have these symptoms, but I'd have come clean with the first doctor that sidled up when my mom was out of the room to grill me).

The side effect list for the MRI contrast drugs (at least back then) is horrific. I remember it ended with "multiple organ failure , cardiac arrest" and a note that they only did the procedure with a crash cart and trained doctor next door.

Ignorance would have been bliss at that point. (Was fine of course. Rare side effects are rare).
Mandella
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Reply #38105 on: December 15, 2018, 10:47:54 AM


Apparently now I'll just go twice a month for a half dose. Still worth it.

I'd like to ask you to elaborate a bit on your treatment, since I've been trying to convince my wife to explore similar procedures. She's one of those people who is frighteningly allergic to animal dander, especially cat, and also allergic to pretty much anything blooming. But the problem is she had some sort of desensitization procedures back in the flippin eighties (or maybe seventies) that was really uncomfortable and didn't really work anyhow, and now she just figures there's no recourse unless she wants to move into a bubble.

I have problems believing that anyone can get used to not being able to breath every once in a while, and also have the regular guy reaction that everything is fixable, if you tinker with it long enough.

So anyhow, what are you allergic to, and when the treatments are not trying to kill you how well are they mitigating the targeted allergic reactions?
HaemishM
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Reply #38106 on: December 15, 2018, 12:13:31 PM

The side effect list for the MRI contrast drugs (at least back then) is horrific. I remember it ended with "multiple organ failure , cardiac arrest" and a note that they only did the procedure with a crash cart and trained doctor next door.

My buddy's mother (in her '80's) just recently went in for breathing trouble and they gave her the contrast dye for CAT scan or MRI or one of those tests. She was apparently one of those rare cases that is allergic to the dye, went into organ failure and was in a coma for about 2 weeks. They got her well enough to transfer to an rehab facility and about 2 weeks later, she was dead of heart failure. I'm not sure how or why they don't test for those kinds of allergies before they give you the full dye job but apparently it's bad enough that if you ARE allergic, it's at best a coin flip whether you ever recover. Granted, her age probably didn't help but it was certainly one of those things that came out of nowhere.

Morat20
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Reply #38107 on: December 15, 2018, 01:11:10 PM

I'd like to ask you to elaborate a bit on your treatment, since I've been trying to convince my wife to explore similar procedures. She's one of those people who is frighteningly allergic to animal dander, especially cat, and also allergic to pretty much anything blooming. But the problem is she had some sort of desensitization procedures back in the flippin eighties (or maybe seventies) that was really uncomfortable and didn't really work anyhow, and now she just figures there's no recourse unless she wants to move into a bubble.

I have problems believing that anyone can get used to not being able to breath every once in a while, and also have the regular guy reaction that everything is fixable, if you tinker with it long enough.

So anyhow, what are you allergic to, and when the treatments are not trying to kill you how well are they mitigating the targeted allergic reactions?
Well, first you go to an allergist -- definitely a specialist, not your family doctor unless his specialty is allergist. And they'll run one of three tests depending on your complaints -- the primary two are "Environmental" and "Food" (they won't run them together, they'll do one and make you wait a few weeks before another). They can also do a "common chemical" one, but most insurance companies won't cover that one.

I got the "environmental" since my primary allergies were seasonal. That also covers animal dander, so that's pretty much what your wife will get. (The actual Doctor will recommend what to do after talking to you about your symptoms). If you want to do the testing panel the at your first appointment, mention that -- you have to refrain from antihistamines for a set period before the panel (about a week), and there's a variety of medications that also don't play well. (A lot of common drugs for depression and several for heart issues, IIRC). I think mostly they make you come back in, as the testing process lasts at least an hour.

The test is pretty simple. You'll take your shirt off, and they've got these little panel thingies with six or eight tiny little needles (you can't even feel them go in) in each panel, each dipped in an allergen. There's three controls (saline, 1mg of histamine, and I think 5mg of histamine). I think they do...50 or 60 common allergins. They take the little panels and press them into your back in order. Then you spend 20 minutes not being allowed to scratch which is the worst part entirely. Then they come in and measure which of the pin-pricks of allergen reacted, and how big the reaction was compared to the controls. (They'll put cortisone cream on you at that point).

Then the retest some of the most common on your arms, using actual syrriges (it's right under the skin, not into muscle) and some of the ones you reacted to. And then another twenty minutes of itching, then blissful cortisone relief.

So then the doctor will come back in and give you a list of everything you're allergic to, and how badly allergic you are. And then tell you how  allergy treatments work.

They'll order three vials made up specifically based on your allergies, with each vial containing about a third of the things you're allergic to. Then they'll give you tiny doses of each, and each time you come back they'll give you a slightly more. (If it's just grass allergies, they have a pill only form instead of injections. But that's only an option if you're really allergic to grasses, and not very allergic to much else. Which is a solid number of people, apparently). It takes a long time to build up to the full does, as you can't go more than every two or three days. Once you're on the full dose, you just go once a month. They make you wait 20 minutes after your injections, in case what happened to me happens to you. The first couple of rounds of doses can be done at home but...it was easier just to go.

So pick an allergist within driving distance of work or home. You'll be there monthly at the end, but weekly in the beginning.

Now they have options if you don't want to spend two years or so building up to a full dose. There's what my Doc calls the "Rush" (which I did) or the "mini-clusters" which is new.  The Rush is done by filling you to the gills with steroids and anti-histamines for a week, then you show up one morning early, they hook you to an IV, and you get allergy shots every 15 minutes (three at a time) until you start to react. Then they stop and watch you for an hour to make sure the reaction is gone (by "Reaction" they mean "skin flushing". They don't mess around, because you getting red skin after all the steroids in you means you'd be in real trouble without them, so they don't push). Then you wait like a week or so, and you go back and they give you a lower dose than you stopped at, and then you go weekly from there.

The mini-cluster is like the rush, only they split it over two or three Saturdays in a row. They push your body less and it's like two hours at a time.

My rush took about 5 hours before I started reacting. There's 7 levels, each with at least 5 sub-levels. I ended up almost done with level 6, so they dropped me from 6-5 or 6-4 to 6-2 for my first "weekly" shot. I bypassed about 80% of the build-up.

Then I got to 7-5 (the full dose) and did that for 3 years. Then I had a repeat of the skin test after 3 years, which showed a sizeable measurable drop in every allergen I reacted to., and then went again for like a year. I got new vials a few weeks ago, and they drop you to 7-1 on a new vials (because the actual concentration can vary a bit) and make you spend four weeks getting back to 7-5. I was on 7-4, and for some reason I reacted badly and got the living shit scared out of me. So now I'll do two visit a month, that add up to a 7-5 dose, rather than one 7-5 dose. To avoid that. I don't know if that'll change in the future or what. There were a couple of mitigating factors in hindsight, but the doctor doesn't like to mess around with that, you know?

All that to say: It was and remains absolutely worth it. I went from living a minimum of 6 months a year on decongestants and antihistames, with the constant headaches and fatigue from swollen sinuses that went with it, to...well, not doing that. Even last year, when everything I was allergic to had dialed up to 11, I think I had problems for about 2 weeks. The shots themselves? The normal reaction is some swelling at the injection site (maybe quarter sized) that disappears within 24 hours, and the urge to take a nap for about 4 hours. I went over 4 years with nothing worse than that, and what happened to me was both pretty rare and something the clinic was prepared to handle.

My son only went three years (and half-assed at least a full year, where he never made it to his full dose) and went from every summer having constant red eyes, eczema so bad it was on the verge of permanent scaring, and a few other issues every time he went outside to not having to do anything. His was so bad they had to treat him with steroids, eye drops, and antihistamines for two weeks before they were comfortable taking him off anything for a week to do the skin test. It was really bad, and now he doesn't even notice. (That's a pretty best case result, and I think him being 14 when he started was probably a big factor). Although I do suspect in about 5 years he'll have to go back.

That being said: I think the reductions are fairly permanent after three years, but you can become allergic to new things and they can creep back, and the longer you do it the better and longer the results last. So really plan on doing it for at least 5 years. A year's worth of vials costs about 800 bucks, the Rush or miin-cluster treatments are best done if you've met your deductible (IV, taking up a room for several hours, and at least two nurses are checking in on you every 10 to 20 minutes, plus the doctor every 40). But once your allergies are charted, any allergy clinic can request the vials and continue your treatment -- they have plenty of kids going to college midway through it, and can transfer it easily even to another state so that there's no missing your injections.

So I'll be back in two weeks for my next shots. And I'll be doing this at least until my next allergy tests, which is in about two years. So six years total. It's not bad. 20 minutes once a month, on average. The place is right on the way to work, and generally I schedule it on my off-fridays. Hell, getting an affordable epipen (required) was more of a hassle than anything else, until last year.
Mandella
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Reply #38108 on: December 15, 2018, 01:54:57 PM

Thanks. I've read about the procedures, but I really wanted to get your personal response to them (which I got, thanks again). Guess I need to start bugging the wife about getting this started again -- it's funny how people can just get used to life threatening conditions and prefer them to the stress of actually doing something about it.

Not that *I* would ever do something like that, of course...

 Ohhhhh, I see.
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