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calapine
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Reply #700 on: January 07, 2017, 05:19:42 PM

That's a great shot.

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Reply #701 on: January 11, 2017, 01:47:45 PM

Launch failure alert Heartbreak

Progress MS-04, an unmanned cargo spacecraft, enroute to the ISS crashed in Russia.

Telemetry was lost 383 seconds after launch, when the craft was still attached to the Soyuz carrier rocket, whose third stage was working at that time.

That's about all that is known so far.



If anyone remembers this, it's the destroyed Progress cargo ship from December of last year. Bound for the ISS but never made it.  Roscomos released it's preliminary investigation results:

The short summary is "Russian QA strikes again". The longer version:

1) An "non-standard separation" occurred between the Progress spacecraft and it's carrier Soyuz 3rd stage,
2) due to the rupture of the 3rd stage stage oxidizer tank.
3) Itself caused by a failure of the 3rd stage 11D55 engine (aka engines explodes, shrapnel hits tank).
4) The failure of the engine in turn was caused by a fire and subsection destruction of it's oxidizer pump.
5) The failure of the oxidizer pump likely due to injection of foreign objects or improper clearance between the pump's shaft and its attachment sleeve, floating rings and impellers, leading to a possible loss of balance and vibration of the rotor.
6) Leading to the root cause: Manufacturing error.  

Ohhhhh, I see.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2017, 02:09:20 PM by calapine »

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Reply #702 on: January 14, 2017, 01:01:22 PM

Tip of the hat to arch-capitalist Elon and SpaceX for taking a break from masturbating to Ayn Rand to launch a successful return to flight!  why so serious?

Seriously, watching that unbroken video of the booster return first person was amazing. Hope they can return to their cadence and keep em flying.

Shine on you magnificent hipsters!
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Reply #703 on: January 14, 2017, 02:44:45 PM

Here is the webcast: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WimRhydggo

Liftoff is at 28:39, the interesting part of the landing starts around 5 minutes later.

Too long, didn't watch: Here is 15 second GIF:

« Last Edit: January 14, 2017, 02:53:26 PM by calapine »

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Reply #704 on: January 16, 2017, 05:25:27 PM

My bro and law just got a job at SpaceX and was at Saturdays launch. Jealous.
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Reply #705 on: February 01, 2017, 12:44:48 PM

The Cat’s Paw and Lobster Nebulae (yes, really) as seen by ESO's Very Large Telescope:

Click to enlarge to 4000x3160:



Quote from: ESO
This spectacular image from the VLT Survey Telescope shows the Cat’s Paw Nebula (NGC 6334, upper right) and the Lobster Nebula (NGC 6357, lower left). These dramatic objects are regions of active star formation where the hot young stars are causing the surrounding hydrogen gas to glow red. The very rich field of view also includes dark clouds of dust. With around two billion pixels this is one of the largest images ever released by ESO. A zoomable version of this giant image is available here.

Note that the circular features in the image around bright stars are not real, they are due to reflections within the optics of the telescope and camera.

If anyone wants the full 4GB image or a smaller 940 mb jpg: http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1705a/

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Reply #706 on: February 01, 2017, 12:54:08 PM

New desktop background, thank you.

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Reply #707 on: February 01, 2017, 01:18:45 PM

New desktop background, thank you.

--Dave

It's very nice. My own background is actually the surrounding of an ESO site:


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Reply #708 on: February 07, 2017, 08:02:33 AM


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Reply #709 on: February 08, 2017, 07:15:25 PM

My bro and law just got a job at SpaceX and was at Saturdays launch. Jealous.
so are the rumors of 100 hour work weeks for engineers there true?

what's that even come out to, $2.50/hr?

Don't get me wrong, I love what Space-X is trying to do in many ways. I just hope (but doubt) that the "little people" who actually sacrifice the blood, sweat and tears, not to mention many many hours away from their families, to turn dreams into reality are rewarded with more than attaboy's and bragging rights.

Yes, I know I'm paranoid, but am I paranoid enough?
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Reply #710 on: February 08, 2017, 11:49:58 PM

I'm not sure about now since its grown so much in the last few years, but I know they were running with a startup model, and all new employees received stock in the company as well as normal compensation/perks.  That's enough to drive most people I know in startups to work 100 hour work weeks.

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Reply #711 on: February 09, 2017, 08:25:21 AM

I just hope (but doubt) that the "little people" who actually sacrifice the blood, sweat and tears, not to mention many many hours away from their families, to turn dreams into reality are rewarded with more than attaboy's and bragging rights.

Very accurate of the Space Race in the 1960's.

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Reply #712 on: February 09, 2017, 08:34:49 AM

Since we are talking about the Company with X there are some news:


1) Rumororish rumor that there will be an attempt at fairing recovery at the launch after the next one (sometime in early March.)

2) The second info (more solid) is that the Red Dragon (a Dragon 2 capsule launched on Falcon Heavy, being sent to Mars and attempting a landing) is postponed from 2018 to somewhere around June ~ 2020.

Dreagoa's brother: Confirm or Deny?  why so serious?

Edit:
The payload fairing re-use idea isn't only pursued by SpaceX. Swiss RUAG Space, who builds the fairings for Ariane 5 and the Amercian Atlas V, is in the study phase as well. The issue is, similar to a lot of re-use plans, not is it possible but is it possible in a cost-effective way without increasing the risk for the payload when using "used" components. A re-use fairing would have to deal with salt water, for example. Also being structurally tough enough to survive a landing, but any extra weight reduces the rockets payload, etc etc.

Nevertheless they are surprisingly expensive, considering they are just a "cover" and dropped after 3 minutes flight. Arianespace pays around ~$6 million for one.

Picture of a small Ariane 5 fairing:




The purpose of the fairing is protect the satellite from a) the aerodynamic forces during flight b) from the acoustic vibrations of the launch. Which nevertheless can reach ~140 dB at the satellite.

Sorry for the jumbled writing style, my mind is a mush, long day at work.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2017, 08:57:55 AM by calapine »

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Reply #713 on: February 09, 2017, 03:11:15 PM

"Blue Jet" seen from the ISS. Click for full size.





(c) Photo by Danish Astronaut Andreas Morensen. Background article

« Last Edit: February 09, 2017, 03:12:47 PM by calapine »

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Reply #714 on: February 09, 2017, 03:46:14 PM

Looks like they need some Imperial Slaves....

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Reply #715 on: February 12, 2017, 02:54:38 PM

Short space news update:

Firstly, SpaceX just had their 3-second static fire test for the upcoming CRS-10 resupply mission to the ISS.
All the American Spacecadets on the Internet are super excited about this because it's on SLC-39A, the historic pad that was built for Apollo and the Space Shuttle.

So hold on to your seats, here it comes:



Launch date for this rocket is the 18th. As always with SpaceX delays are likely to occur.


Secondly, the Air Forces super secret X-37B, after having been in space for an impressive ~630 days, is going to land back at Cape.
What really did there we don't know, because military. Spooky!




Thirdly, an old launch (2014) but just found this now. A short (only 1 minute, it's worth it) slow-motion music video of Soyuz from Kourou (French Guyana)

Décollage de Soyouz depuis Sinnamary
« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 03:07:15 PM by calapine »

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Reply #716 on: February 15, 2017, 11:33:16 PM

Science imitating art:



Click for full size image

Quote from: ESA
While the pastel tones and fine texture of this image may bring to mind brush strokes on an artist’s canvas, they are in fact a visualisation of data from ESA’s Planck satellite. The image portrays the interaction between interstellar dust in the Milky Way and the structure of our Galaxy’s magnetic field.
Between 2009 and 2013, Planck scanned the sky to detect the most ancient light in the history of the Universe – the cosmic microwave background. It also detected significant foreground emission from diffuse material in our Galaxy which, although a nuisance for cosmological studies, is extremely important for studying the birth of stars and other phenomena in the Milky Way.

Among the foreground sources at the wavelengths probed by Planck is cosmic dust, a minor but crucial component of the interstellar medium that pervades the Galaxy. Mainly gas, it is the raw material for stars to form.

Interstellar clouds of gas and dust are also threaded by the Galaxy’s magnetic field, and dust grains tend to align their longest axis at right angles to the direction of the field. As a result, the light emitted by dust grains is partly ‘polarised’ – it vibrates in a preferred direction – and, as such, could be caught by the polarisation-sensitive detectors on Planck.

Scientists in the Planck collaboration are using the polarised emission of interstellar dust to reconstruct the Galaxy’s magnetic field and study its role in the build-up of structure in the Milky Way, leading to star formation.

In this image, the colour scale represents the total intensity of dust emission, revealing the structure of interstellar clouds in the Milky Way. The texture is based on measurements of the direction of the polarised light emitted by the dust, which in turn indicates the orientation of the magnetic field.

This image shows the intricate link between the magnetic field and the structure of the interstellar medium along the plane of the Milky Way. In particular, the arrangement of the magnetic field is more ordered along the Galactic plane, where it follows the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Small clouds are seen just above and below the plane, where the magnetic field structure becomes less regular.

From these and other similar observations, Planck scientists found that filamentary interstellar clouds are preferentially aligned with the direction of the ambient magnetic field, highlighting the strong role played by magnetism in galaxy evolution.

The emission from dust is computed from a combination of Planck observations at 353, 545 and 857 GHz, whereas the direction of the magnetic field is based on Planck polarisation data at 353 GHz.

ESA


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Reply #717 on: February 16, 2017, 03:13:58 PM

NASA Orion update

Today Airbus and ESA signed a 200 million Euro contract to build a second 'European Service Module' (ESM) for NASA's Orion capsule.

Both ESM will be handed over to NASA (for free) as part of a barter agreement to pay ESA's share of the International Space Station.

ESM number 1 is in construction and will be used on the first flight of SLS and Orion (Exploration Mission-1, uncrewed) in 2018.

EM-2 is planned for 2021, will be manned and go somewhere to the Moon, ESM number 2 will be used for it.

Orion Capsule + ESM looks like this:





Not all is built in Europe though. The ESM 25.7 kN main engine comes from NASA and is a re-used the Space Shuttle OSM (Orbital Maneuvering System) thruster.
Seen here, (left) the small "small" engines above the SSME and (right) a during vibration testing



The engine for the first ESM already has flown 19 times in space and was onbard of Challenger, Atlantis and Discovery.

Than there are 8x 490 N auxiliary thrusters for backup (built by Aerojet Rocketdyne) and 24x 220 N thrusters of the Reaction Control System (built by Airbus).


Aside from that most of the ESM the ESM is based on technology ESA developed for the ATV, most recognizable in the solar panels retaining the X-wing layout.
Seen nicely this in this picture of ATV-5 approaching the ISS and firing it's RCS thrusters (the same 220 N ones Orion will use):





And here some actual Orion hardware. Solal panel unfolding test:





To withstand the G-load during firing of the main engine Airbus came up with something simple but ingenuous. The wings are canted into maneuvering positions:



Repositioning aside the solar panels can bend up 1 meter during maneuvers, cameras on each wing tip will closely monitor the movement. That should also make for some nice pictures...



Well, that it's. Provided NASA doesn't change plans or Trump starts WW3 we should this all in "real life" 2018 or 2019 latest. *knock on wood*
« Last Edit: February 16, 2017, 03:17:49 PM by calapine »

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Reply #718 on: February 19, 2017, 08:25:39 AM

SpaceX


After aborting yesterday at T- 13 seconds due to an issue with the upper stage nozzle accutor today's Falcon 9 launch went fine and produced some nice images:








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Reply #719 on: February 20, 2017, 08:58:28 AM



Seriously, I'm not a space fan, but this shit is amazing.

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Reply #720 on: February 21, 2017, 12:17:30 PM


2) The second info (more solid) is that the Red Dragon (a Dragon 2 capsule launched on Falcon Heavy, being sent to Mars and attempting a landing) is postponed from 2018 to somewhere around June ~ 2020.

Dreagoa's brother: Confirm or Deny?  why so serious?

Now confirmed by Shotwell: SpaceX pushes back its first Mars mission

Altough it's hard to get mad over this, the inital target was so ambitous it was clear it wouldn't be kept. Why they didn't announce a 2020 (or later) date right at the beginning, and thus avoiding having to offically delay the mission, is something I don't understan with SpaceX marketing.



In other Mars news:

The giant ITS (Interplanetary Transport System) LOX tank test article asploded.



From what I heard this was not supposed a destructive test (but rather the first one with actual LOX) so a bit of an oopsy.


In unrelated news, the first flight of ITS to Mars is still on schedule for 2020.  rolleyes rolleyes

« Last Edit: February 21, 2017, 12:23:06 PM by calapine »

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Reply #721 on: February 21, 2017, 12:21:17 PM

Hype?

"Nasa to host major press conference on 'discovery beyond our solar system' "

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/nasa-announcement-press-conference-today-solar-system-exoplanet-sun-planets-news-latest-a7590281.html


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Reply #722 on: February 21, 2017, 12:29:00 PM



Seriously, I'm not a space fan, but this shit is amazing.

Flashbacks to playing Lunar Lander as a kid.  Impressive.

I actually thought for a second it was a takeoff video reversed to fool me, but the dust cloud at the landing site would be harder to fake than that.   DRILLING AND MANLINESS

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Reply #723 on: February 22, 2017, 12:07:14 PM

Quote
NASA revealed that, using the Spitzer Space Telescope, they've found seven new Earth-sized planets orbiting a star just 40 light years away from us. What's more, three of those exist within the "Goldilocks zone" which could be habitable for life.
NASA realease

That's 7 rocky planets around a single star, not bad.


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Reply #724 on: February 26, 2017, 11:52:16 AM

Have any of you folks played with Space Engine at all? It's basically a free version of Universe Sandbox. I only discovered it today and I'm having a blast with it. Seems like it might be the kind of thing some of you would enjoy.

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Reply #725 on: February 26, 2017, 03:25:28 PM

Have any of you folks played with Space Engine at all? It's basically a free version of Universe Sandbox. I only discovered it today and I'm having a blast with it. Seems like it might be the kind of thing some of you would enjoy.

Wow. Romanyuk has really advanced his space sim in the last few years. He is (or was, I haven't been over in a while) a frequent Orbiter modder, and I played an early version of this some time ago. It was pretty fun and awe inspiring even then.

I'll have to give it another go, once Kerbal relinquishes its grip on my soul...
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Reply #726 on: February 27, 2017, 02:48:34 PM



Hype incoming...

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Reply #727 on: February 27, 2017, 02:53:24 PM

More PR. They aren't likely to get their man-rating for the Dragon from NASA by the end of 2018 as things currently stand.

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Reply #728 on: February 27, 2017, 02:58:39 PM

Yeah, Musk likes to publish bold dates for things that don't often come true, though usually he does follow through with them.

Though, I'm curious.  Does it have to be NASA astronauts if its entirely a SpaceX internal mission to launch and fly back?  Could they just use their own employees for such a case, if it's not touching the Space Station?  Do they need it to be man rated by the government first?

Have no idea what the LAWS OF SPACE actually are.

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Reply #729 on: February 27, 2017, 03:02:02 PM

More PR. They aren't likely to get their man-rating for the Dragon from NASA by the end of 2018 as things currently stand.

That. GAO (Government Accountability Office) estimates delays to 2019 for both Dragon 2 and Boeing Starliner. NASA is just studying wether to buy more Soyuz seats or do a 1 year ISS mission (thus needing less crew rotation)


Yeah, Musk likes to publish bold dates for things that don't often come true, though usually he does follow through with them.

Though, I'm curious.  Does it have to be NASA astronauts if its entirely a SpaceX internal mission to launch and fly back?  Could they just use their own employees for such a case, if it's not touching the Space Station?  Do they need it to be man rated by the government first?

Have no idea what the LAWS OF SPACE actually are.

The official SpaceX announcement talks of two private individual that "paid a significant deposit to do a moon mission".

http://www.spacex.com/news/2017/02/27/spacex-send-privately-crewed-dragon-spacecraft-beyond-moon-next-year

I found this line funny: "Additional information will be released up confirmation of the health and fitness test results." So they just took the money and said "We sort our the rest later"?
« Last Edit: February 27, 2017, 03:03:53 PM by calapine »

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Reply #730 on: February 27, 2017, 03:18:00 PM

But it's a typical SpaceX PR play - get people excited and have big name press write about SpaceX. Later they silently announce a delay that only specialized magazines and websites will cover. By 2018 most people will forget while the original connection between positive emotions and the brand will remain.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2017, 03:20:40 PM by calapine »

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Reply #731 on: February 27, 2017, 03:27:50 PM

Yeah, Musk likes to publish bold dates for things that don't often come true, though usually he does follow through with them.

Though, I'm curious.  Does it have to be NASA astronauts if its entirely a SpaceX internal mission to launch and fly back?  Could they just use their own employees for such a case, if it's not touching the Space Station?  Do they need it to be man rated by the government first?

Have no idea what the LAWS OF SPACE actually are.

SpaceX needs an FAA permit to launch their rocket over US airspace and the FAA most likely won't give them the permit to launch without the NASA man-rating on the capsule. Since the first un-manned test flights are not likely to happen until mid-2018 I can't see a manned flight happening until at least mid-2019.

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Reply #732 on: February 27, 2017, 05:07:46 PM

Apparently some in here forgot the timelines made during Apollo. The man-rating is doable if everyone has their shit together.

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Reply #733 on: February 27, 2017, 05:26:44 PM

Apparently some in here forgot the timelines made during Apollo. The man-rating is doable if everyone has their shit together.

With Trump in the White House I wouldn't even bet on NASA still existing by 2018.

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Reply #734 on: February 27, 2017, 05:48:33 PM

The official SpaceX announcement talks of two private individual that "paid a significant deposit to do a moon mission".

http://www.spacex.com/news/2017/02/27/spacex-send-privately-crewed-dragon-spacecraft-beyond-moon-next-year

I found this line funny: "Additional information will be released up confirmation of the health and fitness test results." So they just took the money and said "We sort our the rest later"?

So they found two people who ponied up big bucks for an Early Access space program?

It'd be really amusing if one of the people is Mr Star Citizen--using Early Access money from a virtual space program to pay for a ride into space on an Early Access launch vehicle. Hey, if Lord British can go into space...
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