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Author Topic: First Planeswalker card promoed  (Read 17031 times)
Johny Cee
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on: August 27, 2007, 08:56:05 PM

The first planeswalker card is up:



People are still trying to figure out how they work.  The "5" in the bottom right corner is loyalty.  It seems that the abilities interact with the loyalty total.  Planeswalkers can be attacked by creatures instead of the player,  and your critters can block these attackers.  Attacks decrease loyalty points.

The consensus seems to be that planeswalker (PW) abilities will be limited in use,  otherwise this card reads "pay 5,  opponent discards his/her hand,  you can vamp tutor or reanimate all creatures".

The most likely scenarios:

1.  Conservative - PWs can only use one ability when triggered at upkeep. 

2. Moderate - One ability per turn,  abilities are sorcery speed.

3. Not bloody likely - Can use each ability once per turn,  sorcery speed.

Margalis
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Reply #1 on: August 28, 2007, 02:22:32 AM

This looks and sounds suspiciously like the WOW card game.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
schild
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WWW
Reply #2 on: August 28, 2007, 02:27:34 AM

Had this shit been brought out before Homelands, I'd have quit earlier.

I hate wildly game changing mechanics. Even when I don't know what they are. (in games that don't need them that is - I'll kill you if you mention SWG).
Ironwood
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Reply #3 on: August 28, 2007, 05:05:05 AM

Somewhere I hear the sound of barrels being scraped.

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cmlancas
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Reply #4 on: August 28, 2007, 06:49:48 AM

If I had to guess, I would say that you do get pet to pick one every upkeep/discard phase. Loyalty probably is just a fancy way of saying counters, imo.

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Margalis
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Reply #5 on: August 28, 2007, 06:17:13 PM

Anyone here familiar with the WOW card game? Seriously this really sounds like almost a direct rip.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Johny Cee
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Reply #6 on: August 28, 2007, 11:31:51 PM

Anyone here familiar with the WOW card game? Seriously this really sounds like almost a direct rip.

From what I've read,  it's also very similar to a card type from a Mechwarrior CCG.
Margalis
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Reply #7 on: August 29, 2007, 01:07:17 AM

To elaborate a bit, in WOW instead of being a wizard with HP you have a leader type of card that is always on the board. It can be attacked and defended. It functions as a way to limit deck composition, the way colors do in magic. Instead of colors and a mana base you have a leader that only works with some compatible cards, for example "horde wizards" or "alliance archers and spearmen." (Not real examples, I don't play the WOW game myself)

These cards remind me of WOW for the following:

1. They appear to be board precenses that can be attacked and defended by creatures, similar to WOW.
2. The concept of loyalty and the importance of tribes leads me to believe that they will function to restrict deck composition similar to WOW.

I've heard the WOW card game is pretty good and it has an interesting way of dealing with mana screw issues. Any card can be used as a land, but some are super-lands. (Basically)

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Johny Cee
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Reply #8 on: August 30, 2007, 11:47:59 PM

To elaborate a bit, in WOW instead of being a wizard with HP you have a leader type of card that is always on the board. It can be attacked and defended. It functions as a way to limit deck composition, the way colors do in magic. Instead of colors and a mana base you have a leader that only works with some compatible cards, for example "horde wizards" or "alliance archers and spearmen." (Not real examples, I don't play the WOW game myself)

These cards remind me of WOW for the following:

1. They appear to be board precenses that can be attacked and defended by creatures, similar to WOW.
2. The concept of loyalty and the importance of tribes leads me to believe that they will function to restrict deck composition similar to WOW.

I've heard the WOW card game is pretty good and it has an interesting way of dealing with mana screw issues. Any card can be used as a land, but some are super-lands. (Basically)

The new PW cards appear to be a cross between Vanguard avatars (or the cardboard vanguard dealy they did years ago) and the old enchant worlds.  Basically,  superpowered enchantments that have usable abilities in line with a color's specific forte. 

You cast them from hand.  Since they aren't a creature or enchantment,  they aren't vulnerable to that kind of removal.  Making them vulnerable to creature attack means they aren't "Iwin" buttons,  and bolsters the tribal/creature base that Lorwyn is centered around.

I think someone on mtgsalvation found a quote where one of the designers said decks based around a planeswalker would be an alternate to tribal based decks.  Obviously,  the above card would seem to be a pretty decent win condition in a monoblack control deck.

Planeswalkers look like they will be way too slow for an aggro or combo deck.

The other two mechanics revealed in Lorwyn so far are "evoke" and "champion". 

Evoke is on critters with come into play abilities,  and allows you to play the card for the ability then immediately sac the critter,  for a reduced mana cost.  The black evoke critter is:



So,  it's either a critter with a terror effect,  or can just be played as a terror.  Evoke is an ability,  so you can't counter an evoke.


Champion critters remove a card of type <tribe> on your side of the board when the come into play,  and usually have a reduced casting cost.  The card removed comes back into play when your champion critter is killed.  Works like Faceless Butcher,  except for your own creatures.

The green champion card:



So, turn 1: forest, lanowar elf
turn 2: land, another elf (preferably with come into play ability)
turn 3: Wren's Run Packmaster, remove elf

Turn 3 5/5,  with a pretty good ability?  Not bad.  If your opponent Wraths or sweeps the board,  the removed elf comes back into play (potentially you get another shot of it's come into play ability too).
Johny Cee
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Reply #9 on: August 30, 2007, 11:54:06 PM

To elaborate a bit, in WOW instead of being a wizard with HP you have a leader type of card that is always on the board. It can be attacked and defended. It functions as a way to limit deck composition, the way colors do in magic. Instead of colors and a mana base you have a leader that only works with some compatible cards, for example "horde wizards" or "alliance archers and spearmen." (Not real examples, I don't play the WOW game myself)

These cards remind me of WOW for the following:

1. They appear to be board precenses that can be attacked and defended by creatures, similar to WOW.
2. The concept of loyalty and the importance of tribes leads me to believe that they will function to restrict deck composition similar to WOW.

I've heard the WOW card game is pretty good and it has an interesting way of dealing with mana screw issues. Any card can be used as a land, but some are super-lands. (Basically)

The real test of any CCG is how they do over more then a couple of years.  Most CCGs fall apart with power inflation and retreaded mechanics,  then turn into a situation where the maker is milking it as hard as they can.

You have to give credit to Wizards for keeping the playing environment fresh without alienating anyone too badly.  The R&D and testing they do is pretty amazing.

The "any card is a land" thing sounds like it came straight from DC10.  That's an alternate ruleset for playing magic,  where you play with all spells but you can play any spell face down and it acts as a land that produces any type of mana.
Margalis
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Reply #10 on: August 31, 2007, 12:15:06 AM

The "any card is a land" thing sounds like it came straight from DC10.  That's an alternate ruleset for playing magic,  where you play with all spells but you can play any spell face down and it acts as a land that produces any type of mana.

That's pretty much how it works in WOW, except that there are "Quest" cards that are lands with benefits. So the question becomes not how many lands you have but how many Quests. You can suffer from flood but never from screw.

How do the targeting rules of champions work? If you remove an elf and I try to terror it in response what happens? It doesn't say "target" so I'm not sure if that is legal. On the other hand removing the other creature isn't part of the casting cast.

My understanding would be that the CIP effect goes on the stack, you can terror, and then when that resolves I remove a creature. So if I have two elves in play I'm ok no matter which one you pick, since I don't pick a target in advance. If you can kill both I'm screwed.

?

Too bad MTGO 3.0 has totally killed my interest in Magic at this point.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Johny Cee
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Reply #11 on: August 31, 2007, 07:25:40 AM

How do the targeting rules of champions work? If you remove an elf and I try to terror it in response what happens? It doesn't say "target" so I'm not sure if that is legal. On the other hand removing the other creature isn't part of the casting cast.

My understanding would be that the CIP effect goes on the stack, you can terror, and then when that resolves I remove a creature. So if I have two elves in play I'm ok no matter which one you pick, since I don't pick a target in advance. If you can kill both I'm screwed.

Yah, that's it.  Champion doesn't target,  so if I have two elves in play,  and then I play the Wren's Run dude,  I'm okay if you terror one of the elves.

It works just like the "rescue" effect from TSP block.

On the other hand,  if I have one elf in play and I play Wren's Run guy and you terror my other elf the Wren's Run guy either fails to be played or gets permanently removed from game.

eldaec
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Reply #12 on: August 31, 2007, 12:35:59 PM

the above card would seem to be a pretty decent win condition in a monoblack control deck.

Would it?

I mean, to activate it as a finisher you either need to combo it with +loyalty, or wait 3 turns, and you need to hope your opponent is playing lots of creatures (you're control remember, not many creatures in your yard), if he's control then...meh.

Wouldn't you just put a 7 mana big-fucking-monster in your deck and get the whole thing sorted in one card?

If Vess could be played earlier and help more with the control aspect prior to the end game then I could see it. But as a control card it seems too slow, as a finisher it is too fiddly and unreliable.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2007, 12:38:48 PM by eldaec »

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Johny Cee
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Reply #13 on: September 01, 2007, 03:20:38 PM

the above card would seem to be a pretty decent win condition in a monoblack control deck.

Would it?

I mean, to activate it as a finisher you either need to combo it with +loyalty, or wait 3 turns, and you need to hope your opponent is playing lots of creatures (you're control remember, not many creatures in your yard), if he's control then...meh.

Wouldn't you just put a 7 mana big-fucking-monster in your deck and get the whole thing sorted in one card?

If Vess could be played earlier and help more with the control aspect prior to the end game then I could see it. But as a control card it seems too slow, as a finisher it is too fiddly and unreliable.

On it's own,  you're right, probably not.  Though Debtor's Knell has seen a fair amount of use as a one or two of win condition.

The whole package?  Yes.

The discard ability is killer in a control vs. control matchup.  Repeatable discard is a game winner,  especially combined with the fact that a PW is only vulnerable to creatures.

The tutor ability is reasonably costed even if you only expect one use out of it.  Play and tutor for Damnation/targetted removal against critters/aggro.  The tutor ability makes a black deck able to use alot of one ofs,  so allows for tool boxing/silver bullets.  Hell,  my Mirrodin/Ons era MBC deck used a few diabolic tutors to good effect.  Just using Vess as a one shot tutor,  5 cc is alright.

The reanimate ability is pretty solid.
eldaec
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Reply #14 on: September 03, 2007, 12:02:07 PM

Da rulz...

Quote from: MaGo
You can play a planeswalker only at the time you could play a sorcery. A planeswalker is a permanent, so when a planeswalker spell resolves, it comes into play under your control. Any spell or ability that affects a permanent (for example, "destroy target permanent") can affect a planeswalker. Note that planeswalkers aren't creatures; if a card says it affects a creature, it won't affect a planeswalker.

PLANESWALKER SUBTYPES
Each planeswalker has a subtype. For example, Garruk Wildspeaker says "Planeswalker -- Garruk" on its type line. These subtypes are also called planeswalker types. These are not creature types; they're an independent list.

* If two or more planeswalkers that share a subtype are in play, they're all put into their owners' graveyards as a state-based effect.

PLANESWALKER LOYALTY
Loyalty is a characteristic only planeswalkers have. Each planeswalker has a loyalty number printed in the lower right corner of the card. This isn't a power or toughness -- it's a new value.

A planeswalker comes into play with a number of loyalty counters on it equal to its loyalty number. While a planeswalker is in play, its loyalty is equal to the number of loyalty counters on it, and its printed loyalty number is ignored.

Damage dealt to a planeswalker results in that many loyalty counters being removed from it; see "Dealing Damage to Planeswalkers" below.

Playing an ability of a planeswalker causes it to gain or lose loyalty; see "Planeswalker Abilities" below. As a planeswalker loses loyalty, that many loyalty counters are removed from it. As a planeswalker gains loyalty, that many additional counters are put onto it.

If a planeswalker's loyalty is 0, it's put into its owner's graveyard as a state-based effect.

While a planeswalker card isn't in play, its loyalty is equal to the number printed in its lower right corner.

PLANESWALKER ABILITIES
Each planeswalker in the Lorwyn set has three activated abilities. These abilities have specific restrictions that aren't spelled out on the card, and their costs use a new symbol.

An ability of a planeswalker may be played only by that planeswalker's controller, and only any time he or she could play a sorcery. A player may play a planeswalker's ability the turn it enters play. A player may not play a planeswalker's ability if any of its abilities have been played already that turn. In other words, you're limited to one ability from each of your planeswalkers during your turn.

The cost to play a planeswalker's ability is represented by an arrow with a number inside. Up-arrows contain positive numbers, such as "+3"; this means "Put three loyalty counters on this planeswalker." Down-arrows contain negative numbers, such as "-1"; this means "Remove one loyalty counter from this planeswalker." You can't play a planeswalker's ability with a negative loyalty cost unless the planeswalker has at least that many loyalty counters on it.

PLANESWALKERS IN COMBAT
Planeswalkers aren't creatures, so they can't attack or block. However, planeswalkers can be attacked.

As the declare attackers step begins, if the defending player controls a planeswalker, the active player declares who or what each attacking creature is attacking: the defending player or one of that player's planeswalkers. All the attacking creatures may attack the same thing, or they may attack different things. If the defending player controls multiple planeswalkers, any or all of them can be attacked during the same combat phase.

As the declare blockers step begins, the defending player declares which creatures he or she controls (if any) are blocking the attacking creatures. The blocking creatures don't care who or what the attackers are attacking.
During the combat damage step, damage from unblocked creatures attacking the defending player, damage from blocked creatures, and damage from blocking creatures is assigned and dealt as normal. Unblocked creatures that are attacking a planeswalker assign and deal their combat damage to that planeswalker, which causes that many loyalty counters to be removed from it. Planeswalkers, like players, don't deal combat damage.

If a creature with trample is attacking a planeswalker and is blocked, the attacker must assign lethal damage to each blocker, and may assign excess damage to the planeswalker. However, a creature with trample that's attacking a planeswalker can't "trample over" that planeswalker and assign combat damage to the defending player.

If a planeswalker leaves play or changes controllers, it's removed from combat and stops being attacked. However, a creature that was attacking that planeswalker isn't removed from combat -- it continues to attack. It may be blocked. If it isn't blocked, it remains an attacking creature but assigns no damage during the combat damage step. If it is blocked, it will deal damage to any creature blocking it as normal. If the attacker has trample, the trample ability has no effect because there's nothing for the creature to assign excess damage to.

In the Two-Headed Giant multiplayer variant, a creature can attack the defending team or attack a planeswalker controlled by either member of that team. A creature attacking a planeswalker can be blocked by creatures controlled by either member of the defending team, not just creatures controlled by the planeswalker's controller.

DEALING DAMAGE TO PLANESWALKERS
If a source you control would deal noncombat damage to an opponent, you may have that source deal that damage to a planeswalker that opponent controls instead. This is a redirection effect: you choose whether to redirect the damage as the redirection effect is applied, and it's subject to the normal rules for ordering replacement effects. The player affected by the damage chooses the order in which to apply such effects, but the controller of the source of the damage chooses whether the damage is redirected. Note that this redirection can't be applied to combat damage.

For example, although you can't target a planeswalker with Shock, you can target your opponent with Shock, and then as Shock resolves, choose to have Shock deal its 2 damage to one of your opponent's planeswalkers. If you do, two loyalty counters are removed from that planeswalker.

You can't choose to split the damage between a player and a planeswalker. In the Shock example above, you couldn't have Shock deal 1 damage to the player and 1 damage to the planeswalker.

If a source you control would deal damage to you, you can't have that source deal that damage to one of your planeswalkers instead.

In a Two-Headed Giant game, damage that would be dealt to a player can't be redirected to a planeswalker his or her teammate controls.

"People will not assume that what they read on the internet is trustworthy or that it carries any particular ­assurance or accuracy" - Lord Leveson
"Hyperbole is a cancer" - Lakov Sanite
Margalis
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Reply #15 on: September 03, 2007, 03:57:43 PM

Clunky.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
eldaec
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Reply #16 on: September 03, 2007, 04:03:08 PM

Clunky.

I tend to agree, especially about...

Oh, PWers are legendary, only we don't have room on the card for that.

and

Oh, player burn hits PWers, only we can't errata every burn card ever. (btw, the rules queries for this one are going to be hilarious)

"People will not assume that what they read on the internet is trustworthy or that it carries any particular ­assurance or accuracy" - Lord Leveson
"Hyperbole is a cancer" - Lakov Sanite
Johny Cee
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Reply #17 on: September 03, 2007, 06:29:54 PM

Clunky.

I tend to agree, especially about...

Oh, PWers are legendary, only we don't have room on the card for that.

and

Oh, player burn hits PWers, only we can't errata every burn card ever. (btw, the rules queries for this one are going to be hilarious)

The legendary thing isn't too bad. 

The ruling on burn is awful.  It's unintuitive.  It also probably makes PWs a no go in most decks.
schild
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Reply #18 on: September 03, 2007, 07:56:15 PM

What a mess. Worse than I thought.
Margalis
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Reply #19 on: September 03, 2007, 11:31:43 PM

The no summoning sickness is going to catch a ton of people as well. It's just really unintuitive.

Seems like an ok idea that got bogged down trying to make the rules work. Magic just isn't made to have proxies for the player.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Raging Turtle
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Reply #20 on: September 04, 2007, 12:55:43 AM

Looks ok to me.  Sure, it'll be confusing at first, but it adds a little flavor and in six months pretty much everyone will have the rules down. 

I thought morphs were a much, much stupider mechanic/card idea.
eldaec
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Reply #21 on: September 04, 2007, 01:19:22 AM

The no summoning sickness is going to catch a ton of people as well. It's just really unintuitive.

This bit works ok for me, because the PWer doesn't tap, so it is no different to any other non-tapping creature ability.

However, having the one per turn rule without making the PWer tap is another aspect of the rules that grates on me.

"People will not assume that what they read on the internet is trustworthy or that it carries any particular ­assurance or accuracy" - Lord Leveson
"Hyperbole is a cancer" - Lakov Sanite
Johny Cee
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Reply #22 on: September 04, 2007, 07:09:07 AM

However, having the one per turn rule without making the PWer tap is another aspect of the rules that grates on me.

Having the PW tap would just lead to major, major problems.  All you would need to do is figure out a way to untap the PW,  and you could combo out.
Special J
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Reply #23 on: September 04, 2007, 09:17:39 AM

These rules aren't hard but very clunky:

Doesn't tap but you can only use it once.
Can't target it but you can target your opponent and re-direct it when it resolves.
No Legend type. But it's legendary.
No summoning sickness.
Creatures, but well, not really.

Seem to be a lot of "Well that's just how they work, ok?"

I'm nervous it could radically change how the game is played.  I wouldn't want to see a situation where every deck needs one to competitive.

If they're a mistake, it's a two-year one.  But other formats get to live with them forever.

Anyone want to take bets whether Doubling Season gets some errata?

EDIT: If I'm reading the rules right, the only spot removal that will work will be burn.  If Planeswalkers end up kicking ass, it'll mess things up even further.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2007, 10:02:17 AM by Special J »
Margalis
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Reply #24 on: September 04, 2007, 03:22:25 PM

Spot removal that targets permanents, like Saltblast, will work as well.

The "only use once a turn" is just a way of tapping without tapping. Just as the card is legendary without being so, and a creature without being a creature and a player without being a player. They should have just made them tap. Sure you can untap them and use them again, then again you can do that with any tapped card. Either that or make it a triggered ability that triggers during upkeep or something like that.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Johny Cee
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Reply #25 on: September 04, 2007, 07:26:00 PM

Spot removal that targets permanents, like Saltblast, will work as well.

The "only use once a turn" is just a way of tapping without tapping. Just as the card is legendary without being so, and a creature without being a creature and a player without being a player. They should have just made them tap. Sure you can untap them and use them again, then again you can do that with any tapped card. Either that or make it a triggered ability that triggers during upkeep or something like that.

If you made tapping the requirement,  you would have to massively tone down the abilities of PWers. 

First,  it would give you abilities at instant speed.  Goodbye discard,  since instant speed discard can lead to soft locks where an opponent never draws again.

Second,  the vast majority of massivelly broken cards have been a result of putting a powerful effect on a tapping artifact (i.e., no summouning sickness).  Figure out a way to untap,  and you can usually combo out the turn it hits play due to no summoning sickness.  There a reason why the Magus cycles from TSP block were both creatures (so summoning sickness) and had the requirement of only being used during upkeep.


PWers that tapped would have had their abilities nerfed into the ground right out of the gate.
Johny Cee
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Reply #26 on: September 04, 2007, 07:37:43 PM

These rules aren't hard but very clunky:

Doesn't tap but you can only use it once.
Can't target it but you can target your opponent and redirect it when it resolves.
No Legend type. But it's legendary.
No summoning sickness.
Creatures, but well, not really.

Seem to be a lot of "Well that's just how they work, ok?"

I'm nervous it could radically change how the game is played.  I wouldn't want to see a situation where every deck needs one to competitive.

If they're a mistake, it's a two-year one.  But other formats get to live with them forever.

Anyone want to take bets whether Doubling Season gets some errata?

EDIT: If I'm reading the rules right, the only spot removal that will work will be burn.  If Planeswalkers end up kicking ass, it'll mess things up even further.

-I think PWers are different enough that the summoning sickness/removal thing will be obvious.  The fact they have no power/toughness will clue most people in.  Wizards did a decent job of emphasizing the difference between a PWer and an enchantment or creature.

-Nothing is going to change with Doubling Season.  It only doubles the counters on the PWer when it comes into play,  not when it's abilities are used.

-The burn situation/redirection of damage from a player is very awkward.  It also will probably mean PWers are completely marginalized,  since one Incinerate will house most of them.

-PWers are very subpar in older formats.  Even Extended has decks that will combo out on turn 2/3 occasionally,  and 4 most of the time, without disruption.  Legacy and Vintage are even worse.


By making PWers vulnerable to burn,  creatures,  and spells that target any permanent (bounce, Vindicate, Saltblast, Angel of Despair, Riftwing Cloudskate, etc.) Wizards has given all colors a method of countering a PWer.  That's good,  since usually your recourse is to play Islands for counter, or lose.

Special J
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Reply #27 on: September 07, 2007, 01:58:56 PM

Yeah, I suppose it is safe to assume that Lorwyn will include answers to Planeswalkers to colours that don't have a decent answer to them.  Something like black getting a Terror that also lets them nuke PWs for example.
Johny Cee
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Reply #28 on: September 07, 2007, 06:24:06 PM



This guy is a house.

He can be dropped turn 3 easily,  and potentially turn 2.  His untap ability lets you power out a slew of critters,  and then Overrun for an an alpha strike.  All before Wrath mana is reached by your opponent.

At worst,  he comes into play and you make a token before handing priority over to your opponent.  They incinerate, killing him.  You both are down a card (so no card disadvantage),  and you still have a 3/3 on the board.

Margalis
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Reply #29 on: September 07, 2007, 09:12:17 PM

Much much better than Liliana. Effects that put cards on top of your lib aren't that great usually. Discarding once a turn at sorcery speed is ok, but needing 5 mana to get that going is tough. It's good against control except that you can't cast her against control.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Calantus
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Reply #30 on: September 08, 2007, 04:11:42 AM

These guys are terribly clunky, but the rules don't seem overly complicated so it shouldn't take too long to get used to them. The real question will be how common they are and how many counters are available, particularly in limited formats. Garruk for instance is a total bomb and if your opponent plays that and you don't have an answer you've pretty-much lost.

When does this come out? I've been thinking of getting back into magic lately but wanted to wait until a new block hits so I'm not behind on card knowledge.

EDIT: Also to be fair to Liliana she does resurrect every creature in all graveyards and put them under your control for 5 mana and 3 turns.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2007, 04:16:14 AM by Calantus »
eldaec
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Reply #31 on: September 08, 2007, 04:52:12 AM

Certainly agree Garruk is a bomb.

First pick pack 3, you have no green, I still think you are taking Garruk.


"People will not assume that what they read on the internet is trustworthy or that it carries any particular ­assurance or accuracy" - Lord Leveson
"Hyperbole is a cancer" - Lakov Sanite
Johny Cee
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Reply #32 on: September 13, 2007, 07:50:11 PM

The white plainswalker has been spoiled:

Ajani Goldmane

Planeswalker - Ajani
+1: You gain 2 life
-1: Creatures you control get +1/+1 and vigilance until end of turn
-6: Put an X/X white Avatar creature token into play with power and toughness each equal to your life total.
Loyalty: 4
Rare.


Underwhelming.  Made up for by:



This card is amazing.  Aggressively costed creature that hoses most common sweepers and most hard counters. 

In Standard -- Seems a shoe-in for W/G or W/G/R aggro decks,  with Tarmogoyf.  Potentially could help power a W/G aggro-control or beats strategy.  Takes care of WoG, Damnation, Tendrils, Mystical Teachings, 4 cc counters, etc.

At worst,  your opponent will need to use targetted removal on him before Wrathing.  This cuts into the card advantage generated by global removal.

In Extended -- Fits right into zoo decks.  He fucks up most combo decks (Tooth, Mind's Desire, Dragonstorm).

Legacy/Vintage -- He says "no" to combo decks and Force of Will.

Also for White:

Oblivion Ring

Enchantment
When Oblivion Ring comes into play, remove target non-land permanent from the game.
When Oblivion Ring leaves play, return the removed permanent to play under its owners control.
COMMON.

Awesome.
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