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f13.net  |  f13.net General Forums  |  The Gaming Graveyard  |  Archived: We distort. We decide.  |  Topic: You swing your Battleaxe +70 and...miss? 0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
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Author Topic: You swing your Battleaxe +70 and...miss?  (Read 18965 times)
HaemishM
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Posts: 37293

Prevent all damage that would be dealt to you and other troops you control.


WWW
Reply #35 on: April 06, 2006, 01:44:56 PM

Anyway, short of mandating connection speeds and latency for users it's not an easy problem.

See, I really don't have a problem with that approach. But I'm sure most VC do.

Telemediocrity
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Reply #36 on: April 06, 2006, 06:54:47 PM

Ahh, sorry, misunderstood what you meant by 'realistic combat'.

When I was fleshing out my spec sheet for Magical Samurai Gank Squad (Someday it'll be possible, until then I dream), I thought about this a lot - and here was the solution I came up with:

First, I'm operating under the assumption of 200 ms lag.  That seems to be a standard enough experience in MMOs that if you make a game playable at 200ms lag, you'll do alright.

Here's what I came up with:  Your character has a sword.  So does the other guy's.  (Hence, the Samurai) Assume that you're both fast-moving and twitchy characters, about like AC1 with 400 runspeed or so.  None of this WoW/EQ/DAoC-like sluggishness.

you're both running around trying to hit one another.  If you want to strike with your sword, using left-click you drag your sword through the air with an arc that you want to attack.  The arc becomes visible to the other player when you drag it, and after releasing from the arc your guy charges up for about 1 sec and then swings through the arc.

Assuming lag, that gives the other player about 0.8 secs to get out of the arc of your sword.

Wouldn't you both end up dodging each other quite a lot, then?  Why yes, you would.

Which is why you'd want to fight one another in groups, and getting the other guy into the arc of a sword would be a strategic challenge.  Hence, the Gank Squad.

Layer spells and special abilities in the usual tap-a-key-to-cast sense.  (Hence, the Magical portion)

Magical Samurai Gank Squad.  It will be so beautiful someday.
Murgos
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Reply #37 on: April 06, 2006, 07:06:39 PM

And yet another example of why ideas actually have no value.

"You have all recieved youre last warning. I am in the process of currently tracking all of youre ips and pinging your home adressess. you should not have commencemed a war with me" - Aaron Rayburn
Telemediocrity
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Posts: 791


Reply #38 on: April 06, 2006, 07:31:11 PM

And yet another example of why ideas actually have no value.

Very true - nearly every 'Mod team' you see is one guy who thinks he's 'the idea man' and looking for everyone else to execute it.

Me personally, I'm interested in tools that allow idea people to transform themselves into execution-people without too much effort.  Case in point: Sauerbraten.

IMHO, if you're looking for new and interesting things to do at current latency, all the really cool options are in 2D - something akin to Sonic the Hedgehog, for instance.
Margalis
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Reply #39 on: April 06, 2006, 07:56:31 PM


It's a tough problem to try and synchronize all the animation. Even doing just two humanoids is hard enough but then multiply that by the various shaped and sized creatures in your typical fantasy game. Some games do do a better job than others, though. FF XI is one of the better ones as is CoH. Beating on EQ skeletons was great fun because of the distinct sound effect when you hit and the skellies would actually stagger (plus they had that maniacal laughter). One of the best RPGs for synchronized combat animation was actually Darklands. There it was all "auto attack"-style combat of course but it actually looked like your little sprites were sword fighting.


It's not a tough problem, it's pretty simple. How is it a tough problem?

The server tells the client that my character swung at the enemy and he blocked. So then on the client side I play the character swinging animation and enemy blocking animation. That's all there is to it.

Now you do run into issues if after you swing you start moving, or change equipment, or something to that effect. But if you are just standing there auto-attacking it's pretty simple.

That stupid "Fly For Free" game or whatever it was called had perfectly synched animation. FFXI is fine unless you start twitching around.

It's not hard - people just neglect it. It's MUCH MUCH harder to make a real action game. MMORPG is just playing canned animations with no real interaction.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Calantus
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Posts: 2389


Reply #40 on: April 06, 2006, 09:51:39 PM

Yeah it wouldn't be hard, you just have to calculate hits/misses in advance, so that by the time the client needs to show the swing it already knows what to do. The problem of course is that this only works on autoattack. Anything that requires user input (unless there's a queing system or w/e) is going to make it impossible to work shit out in advance.
Trippy
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Posts: 20258


Reply #41 on: April 06, 2006, 10:14:33 PM

It's a tough problem to try and synchronize all the animation. Even doing just two humanoids is hard enough but then multiply that by the various shaped and sized creatures in your typical fantasy game. Some games do do a better job than others, though. FF XI is one of the better ones as is CoH. Beating on EQ skeletons was great fun because of the distinct sound effect when you hit and the skellies would actually stagger (plus they had that maniacal laughter). One of the best RPGs for synchronized combat animation was actually Darklands. There it was all "auto attack"-style combat of course but it actually looked like your little sprites were sword fighting.
It's not a tough problem, it's pretty simple. How is it a tough problem?

The server tells the client that my character swung at the enemy and he blocked. So then on the client side I play the character swinging animation and enemy blocking animation. That's all there is to it.
Have you done any 3D animation before? It not an easy task to align the swing which could come from a number of different angles (think how many different weapon attack animations there are in something like WoW) and block animations which would also have multiple versions to match the different swing angles so they don't look stupid and that's with two equally sized humanoid figures. Now throw in radically different sized humanoids and a whole slew of non-humanoid creatures and that's an incredible amount of animation work that would have to be done.

The other problem is latency. Now it does matter that your round trip time might be a half second or more. Your choices are either to have the block show up a half second or more after you swing or you don't actually swing until a half second after you hit the button or key.

To put it another way if it really was a simple problem wouldn't everybody be doing it?
Lantyssa
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Reply #42 on: April 07, 2006, 09:27:10 AM

Have you done any 3D animation before? It not an easy task to align the swing which could come from a number of different angles (think how many different weapon attack animations there are in something like WoW) and block animations which would also have multiple versions to match the different swing angles so they don't look stupid and that's with two equally sized humanoid figures. Now throw in radically different sized humanoids and a whole slew of non-humanoid creatures and that's an incredible amount of animation work that would have to be done.
Pre-rendered animation simply will not be capable of such variety.  For there to be this level of detail, combat will have to be integrated with a physics engine.  A fairly advanced one if it is going to look half-way decent.

Hahahaha!  I'm really good at this!
Kail
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Reply #43 on: April 07, 2006, 02:59:26 PM

Have you done any 3D animation before? It not an easy task to align the swing which could come from a number of different angles (think how many different weapon attack animations there are in something like WoW) and block animations which would also have multiple versions to match the different swing angles so they don't look stupid and that's with two equally sized humanoid figures. Now throw in radically different sized humanoids and a whole slew of non-humanoid creatures and that's an incredible amount of animation work that would have to be done.
Pre-rendered animation simply will not be capable of such variety.  For there to be this level of detail, combat will have to be integrated with a physics engine.  A fairly advanced one if it is going to look half-way decent.

I dunno about that; I think you could get a solid amount of variety out of a hundred or so animations.  You'd just have to make sure everything fits together is all.  Let's say you can get hit high or low.  From the front, back, left, or right.  And one of, say, three strengths: light, heavy, and knockdown.  Say we animate hits and blocks differently, too.  That's just (2x4x3x2) 48 situations for the entire defensive set.  It's not going to be something you can bang out in an hour, but it's not some insane, unattainable goal (for a moderately high budget game, that is).

You don't need to do specific defensive animations for every attack individually, you just need to make sure that every attack falls into one of those categories.  It's not ideal, I'll concede that.  But I'd argue that it is technically feasable, it would look FAR better than something like WoW's non-animation, and it would be more realistically attainable than on-the-fly realistic skeletal calculations.
Lantyssa
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Reply #44 on: April 07, 2006, 03:31:17 PM

Each race, unless they are identical which is boring, would have its own set of 48 animations.  It starts to add up.  At some point it becomes easier to let physics take over than to handcraft everything.

Hahahaha!  I'm really good at this!
Sairon
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Reply #45 on: April 07, 2006, 03:38:27 PM

Each race, unless they are identical which is boring, would have its own set of 48 animations.  It starts to add up.  At some point it becomes easier to let physics take over than to handcraft everything.

Now I'm no expert on animations but I'm fairly certain that this is done fairly easy with bones, which can be scaled. As long as it has a body shape which resembles a human ( which they always do ), it's only a matter of export/import.
Endie
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WWW
Reply #46 on: April 07, 2006, 04:10:54 PM

Ever get in fights lately?  I play rugby, so I have to put up with my fair share, and get to see a few close up.  Even using their fists, not weapons, you'd be amazed how much people miss.  Half the shots are going wide.  And this in a sport where most are not unaccustomed to the noble art.

And as someone said, if your DM is saying, every time you fail your to-hit roll, "you miss", then *he*, not the system, is missing out the drama.  It should be "your swing looks destined to take the top of the orc's head off, but he just ducks in time", or "you throw all your weight behind your swing, but your hammer does no more than dent the gnoll's shield, glancing off it in a shower of sparks".  Purple, over-excited stuff like that...

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Trippy
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Reply #47 on: April 07, 2006, 04:40:02 PM

Each race, unless they are identical which is boring, would have its own set of 48 animations.  It starts to add up.  At some point it becomes easier to let physics take over than to handcraft everything.
Now I'm no expert on animations but I'm fairly certain that this is done fairly easy with bones, which can be scaled. As long as it has a body shape which resembles a human ( which they always do ), it's only a matter of export/import.
Sure you can "scale" the animation but that doesn't mean it will look right. Think about a horizontal swing of a weapon at shoulder height. For two models that are the same height that's basically a swing to the neck (a la a decapitation attack). To block it you need to raise your weapon or shield to shoulder/neck height to the proper side (your left if the opponent is right handed). Now imagine it's a Gnome attacking an Ogre. For the Gnome she's now swinging at the Ogre's kneecaps and the block animation for the Ogre is well over the head of the Gnome.

Like I said originally it's a tough problem which is not to say it's impossible to do but you have to have enough constraints to make it a tractable problem with current technology. There are games out there that do show this sort of synchronized combat animation with weapons such as 3D fighting games like Soul Calibur and games like Onimusha however all those games "cheat" in various ways right now. With 3D fighting games like Soul Calibur there are no extreme differences in height and you are fighting on a line a la Street Fighter (yes I know you can sidestep but you don't block/parry during that, it's a dodge move) so you don't have to animate trying to block an attack from the side. In Onimusha defending an attack usually means the attack "bounces" off the defender which is obviously not realistic but it simplifies trying to have to make the weapons line up properly. Also in Omimusha the game automatically rotates your character to face your attacker when you block so that it doesn't look like you've stuck your sword/weapon out in front of you to block an attack from the side. These games also have many fewer unique models than your typical MMORPG which means you can tweak a lot of the animations by hand to make them look better within a reasonable amount of time (and money).
Bunk
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Operating Thetan One


Reply #48 on: April 08, 2006, 03:08:07 PM

Oblivion's current system is love for me. If you swing and your weapon connects with soemething, you hit. If your oppenent gets a block up in time, your damage is reduced. Your total damage is based on your skill with the weapon. It is not reduced because your opponent is higher level than you (I hate that system), though it might be reduced because he has better armor.

Now it works in Oblivion for a couple reasons. Animations aren't an issue, since combat is first person - if your target is short, you have to lean down and be aiming at it to hit it. Oh, and the second reason it works in Oblivion - it's a single player game.

As long as client/server lag is an issue, its going to be tough to base any system on collision detection in combat. Oh well, ignore me, carry on

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WindupAtheist
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Badicalthon


Reply #49 on: April 08, 2006, 05:36:25 PM

In professional boxing, a 50% hit rate means someone is getting killed.

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Sunbury
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Reply #50 on: April 13, 2006, 08:14:47 AM

I don't like the idea of removing ToHit vs Damage for a simple reason:  It removes depth / tactical choices.

Say you have a choice of using a slow hard hitting weapon, or a fast low damage weapon with the same DPS (against a average mob).

So if you fight a mob you've learned is hard to hit, you use the fast weapon.  If you fight a mob that has a lot of hitpoints, you use the slower one, or it doesn't matter, depending on crit ratios, etc.

I always wished MMORPGs would make more interesting types of mobs, and have the basic model kind of reflect it, without even changing how the engine or physics or animation works, in other words just data and basic model.  But most don't seem to bother.

If you are fighting some high level giant, the ToHit chance should be almost 100%, but its armor and hitpoints are way up there.  But another equal high level monster is some kind of small fast moving mob, thats really hard to hit, but if you do hit it, its dead. 

Likely the reason is that AOE magic would make it too easy to take out high level low HP mobs, so they can't do it, unless they made them almost immune, but then magic only users would complain.

To me the more variation, the more tactical depth, the more choices == more fun, since more to learn, esp. if there are 'hints' by the mobs look.  I don't care about perfect animation, or real-time combat.  To me MMORPG combat is over before it starts, assuming you have the right equipment for the job (weapons, armor, buffs, potions, level, friends etc.)  that's the game, not the actual combat.  The actual incident of combat is just telling you if you are prepared or not, maybe with some randomness tossed in so you are never absolutley sure, and learning about the specifics of a mob type.   I understand how some people don't care for that, they want 'twitch' or more interactive combat, fine, but that doesn't make statistical, round based combat 'bad' or 'invalid' or 'unrealistic', its just a different abstraction.  Both styles could be equally 'valid'.
Kageru
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Reply #51 on: April 15, 2006, 08:43:43 PM


A lot of the solutions sound like over-kill to me. I don't need manual control of my characters dexterity, it has its own attribute representing that feature. Nor do I need precise animations to indicate the exact connection between attack and defence. The first one ends up with "jousting" and latency over-riding the in-game logic. If your character is a weedy mage you shouldn't be dodging like a class that specializes in that ability no matter how good your real life reflexes are. The second is just eye candy, all that's really needed is a visual indication that my character is trying to carry out the task I set it (eg an attack animation) and some indication why it hasn't happened yet (opponent dodges, parries, blocks... or just has a heap more HP).

I'm satisfied with WoW in this context, although obviously more could be done to make it prettier. attacks, special attacks and all the major defensive moves have signature animations to make it clear what's happening. And a character who's dodging, blocking and parrying actually does look like an active participant in a serious fight. The only real additions would be visible damage (which is a lot of work for the real thing, WoW has blood gouts and hp bars) and some indication of critical hits.

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Azazel
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Reply #52 on: April 17, 2006, 12:28:01 AM

I've been watching a bit of UFC lately, and it shows an interesting combination of "realistic" fighting factors.

Misses being common against highly skilled, comparable individuals as they duck, weave, dodge etc against one another. That's part of being in a fighting stance. Just because you don't spam your "dodge" button doesn't mean the target's standing there like they're waiting for a bus. I'd look at "dodge" talents and skills etc as being extraordinary dodges of attacks that would have really hit because, you know, we're talking about superheroic combat. Worrying overly about player-active defensive combat really requires a twitch game.

"Hit points" in that any number of not-knockout blows can slowly bang away at a fighter as their face starts to take on the appearance of tenderised meat while they still manage to continue fighting and being a dangerous opponent (Shamrock vs Ortiz would be a good example). Or any number of more-famous boxing matches where the same happens.

"Lucky blows". Essentially they're your critical strikes. That's where you and I dance around, missing or tapping one another, then I get a decent-force hit to your face or head which doesn't do the knockout damage, but in fact causes a stun, and if I'm fast enough I move in for the kill while you're stunned and then you're fucked. Though in computer games of nearly all types, a critical will just take a bunch of HP off the big red bar and not be anything like that.

Oh, and I liked this article a lot more than your "RP'ers are teh Gayz0rz" one, which seemed to mostly be about you saying that you're not homophobic, but you're also not a fag. And that RP stuff is gay.


http://azazelx.wordpress.com/ - My Miniatures and Hobby Blog.
Llava
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Rrava roves you rong time


Reply #53 on: April 17, 2006, 01:08:07 AM

Misses being common against highly skilled, comparable individuals as they duck, weave, dodge etc against one another. That's part of being in a fighting stance. Just because you don't spam your "dodge" button doesn't mean the target's standing there like they're waiting for a bus. I'd look at "dodge" talents and skills etc as being extraordinary dodges of attacks that would have really hit because, you know, we're talking about superheroic combat. Worrying overly about player-active defensive combat really requires a twitch game.

I would agree here, except that most games consider an "evade" different from a "miss".  City of Heroes is the exception that I can think of, where anything that doesn't land is considered a miss whether it's because you suck or they dodged, but Dark Age of Camelot would be a counter-example.  If you are Evaded, that is different from Missing.

If the dodging party did some sort of dodge animation when avoiding an attack, it would go a long way toward adding some level of interest and drama to the combat.  How a fight looks is important.

And regarding all the above "realistic fights" comments:
I believe it's been said a bunch of times already, but we're talking about "dramatic" fights, not "realistic" ones.  Most of the things that happened in, for instance, The Lord Of the Rings were not "realistic".  They were "dramatic".

The confusion is my fault because I drew a realistic example (throwing a rock at something) before drawing a dramatic example (Legolas fires his bow at Drizzt!).

I made the additional mistake of using the word "Realism" when it wasn't exactly what I was describing.  So, my bad on that one.  MMG fights shouldn't be like real fights, or most fights would be resolved with one hit.

That the saints may enjoy their beatitude and the grace of God more abundantly they are permitted to see the punishment of the damned in hell. -Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica
Azazel
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Reply #54 on: April 17, 2006, 05:44:21 AM

I'd look at "dodge" talents and skills etc as being extraordinary dodges of attacks that would have really hit because, you know, we're talking about superheroic combat.

I would agree here, except that most games consider an "evade" different from a "miss".  City of Heroes is the exception that I can think of, where anything that doesn't land is considered a miss whether it's because you suck or they dodged, but Dark Age of Camelot would be a counter-example.  If you are Evaded, that is different from Missing.

If the dodging party did some sort of dodge animation when avoiding an attack, it would go a long way toward adding some level of interest and drama to the combat.  How a fight looks is important.

And regarding all the above "realistic fights" comments:
I believe it's been said a bunch of times already, but we're talking about "dramatic" fights, not "realistic" ones.  Most of the things that happened in, for instance, The Lord Of the Rings were not "realistic".  They were "dramatic".

The confusion is my fault because I drew a realistic example (throwing a rock at something) before drawing a dramatic example (Legolas fires his bow at Drizzt!).

I made the additional mistake of using the word "Realism" when it wasn't exactly what I was describing.  So, my bad on that one.  MMG fights shouldn't be like real fights, or most fights would be resolved with one hit.

I know what you mean by dodge/evade being different to "miss", and I understand that unarmed combat is different to swinging at each other with pointy sticks, but really, watch some UFC and you'll see plenty of real misses as well as evades and dodges. Would those shots have hit if the target was standing there unawares, sure. But a miss in combat, against an active opponent is still a miss.

As well as that, I left in the bit of my quote above that's importnat in this discussion, since we're dealing with the Legolasses of the (fantasy) world, their "evade" or "dodge" skill would represent the superhuman dodges as opposed to the regular combat ones which (IMO) are mixed in with the regular misses. Those are your near-bullet-time super-duper punch-dodges and parries as opposed to your regular ones. Your dramatic ones instead of your mundane ones, if you weel.

Animation could be nice, but it's the kind of thing that really owes it's feasability to the speed of the game's combat spam. It wouldn't work in EQ1 for example with it's highspeed combat spam, but maybe Vanguard with it's slowed-down combat could pull something like that off.

And yeah, with Legolas shooting his bow at Drizzt, dramatically Drizzt might go bullet-time on us and doge the arrow, while realistically, it's like a rifle shot that hits or misses dependant on the shooter.


http://azazelx.wordpress.com/ - My Miniatures and Hobby Blog.
Margalis
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Reply #55 on: April 17, 2006, 11:27:36 PM

Have you done any 3D animation before? It not an easy task to align the swing which could come from a number of different angles (think how many different weapon attack animations there are in something like WoW) and block animations which would also have multiple versions to match the different swing angles so they don't look stupid and that's with two equally sized humanoid figures.

Sorry, we are talking about different things.

When you mean synchronized animations I thought you meant basic synchronization like timing and such. For example if you play FFXI vs WoW the basic timing and look of combat is a lot better in FFXI, but it doesn't do what are you are saying. There is one shield block animation and if you block it always plays.

That *is* a hard problem. What is not a hard problem is just getting the timing about right, and a lot of games don't even do that.

But really even 3D fighting games, which are ALL about combat, don't do that. That sort of thing can be faked with good animation, hit sparks, etc. If non-online games that are ONLY fighting can't do that I wouldn't hold my breath for it to happen in MMORPGs.

---

About missing in general. I agree that missing adds extra complexity. In FFXI a Thief that has really high evasion can tank certain types of mobs that other tanks can't, because those mobs have bad aim but high damage. Ninjas tank with a combination of evasion and shadows that absorb damage - if enemies never missed the shadows would be absorbed way too fast and the entire system would need dramatic modification.

IMO very simple rules in MMORPGs lead to things like the tank, nuker, healer trinity. In FFXI you have different types of tanks, guys that control hate, guys that gain TP and can start skill-chains, etc, because the rules allow for that. Miss/hit is just on more dimension that you can differentiate based on.

I am a fan of simple rules for most things. Simple tactics are fine are long as there is some depth in strategy. But most MMORPGs don't have a lot of depth of strategy, they are mostly numbers based on want to have as many items/weapons/classes/spells etc as possible.

It's like the difference between Go and Magic:The Gathering. Go has a lot of depth, magic has a lot of breadth. Go with a bunch of extra rules wouldn't be any better, and Magic with most of the rules taken out would be worse. Simplicity works when the rules you do have allow for a lot of rules interaction and depth.

Also it may be my perspective as someone with some martial arts training and knowledge and casual fan of things like UFC and boxing but missing doesn't make me feel weak or underpowered. That's just life - a lot of the time you miss.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Kail
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Reply #56 on: April 18, 2006, 04:00:15 PM

Have you done any 3D animation before? It not an easy task to align the swing which could come from a number of different angles (think how many different weapon attack animations there are in something like WoW) and block animations which would also have multiple versions to match the different swing angles so they don't look stupid and that's with two equally sized humanoid figures.
(snip...)
But really even 3D fighting games, which are ALL about combat, don't do that. That sort of thing can be faked with good animation, hit sparks, etc. If non-online games that are ONLY fighting can't do that I wouldn't hold my breath for it to happen in MMORPGs.

Just to be clear, I'm not claiming that anything less than movie quality animation is bad, and a sign of slothful, incompetent animators.  But there is a HUGE gulf between, say, fighting game quality animation and the animation in a lot of roleplaying games (WoW included among them), and I DO think that it would be both feasible and effective to narrow that gap a little bit, at least.  When I'm standing fifteen feet away from a Tauren, I can't tell if every finger on his hand is individually modelled or not, but when he swings his weapon at an enemy and that enemy doesn't react like he's just been hit with a weapon, I do notice that.  If your goal is to design an immersive game that feels like a real place, then an important step is making the parts of that world look like they realistically interact with each other, and animation is a crucial component of that.  I'm not arguing that we need dynamic animations for every possible scenario that must sync perfectly with every possible action of every possible character in every possible circumstance.  I AM saying that a lot of games, most obviously WoW, could stand some serious improvement to their animation, and that this would help a lot in making combat seem more like actual fighting and less like someone rolling dice and telling you whether you hit or not.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2006, 04:03:33 PM by Kail »
Margalis
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Reply #57 on: April 20, 2006, 09:14:27 PM

Yeah I agree. There is no reason why it can't look like guys are actually fighting.

vampirehipi23: I would enjoy a book written by a monkey and turned into a movie rather than this.
Sky
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WWW
Reply #58 on: April 21, 2006, 06:28:53 AM

This topic is one reason it's great having a non-gamer girlfriend who hasn't ever watched games being played, but enjoys watching me play games. She is always quick to point out things we tend to ignore, like "Why are you swinging your sword a foot left of that orc?" or how beautiful ingame water is (EQ2 and Oblivion), but how shitty the transition between water and land is. You know, I never thought about that.

It's also funny when I stop to marvel at some cool trick, like bloom or an especially nice normal map, and she just expects it to look like that, not having seen the loooong progression to get to where we are.

WayAbvPar
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Reply #59 on: April 21, 2006, 10:36:55 AM

I went through something similar with my wife. After plunking down 3+ bills for a new video card to run Oblivion, I showed it to my wife in all its high res glory (I had been playing it at 800x600 before). Her comment? "It looks the same to me."

When speaking of the MMOG industry, the glass may be half full, but it's full of urine. HaemishM

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Who the hell taught you how to write? Fuck, that sentence is like internet transmitted face-attacking knives. Jesus. schild
Llava
Contributor
Posts: 4602

Rrava roves you rong time


Reply #60 on: May 16, 2006, 11:39:47 AM

I never read GU, but this is a good illustration of what I was talking about with this:
http://www.gucomics.com/archives/view.php?cdate=20060501

That the saints may enjoy their beatitude and the grace of God more abundantly they are permitted to see the punishment of the damned in hell. -Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica
Samwise
Moderator
Posts: 16369

sentient yeast infection


WWW
Reply #61 on: May 16, 2006, 12:01:07 PM

One of the things that initially excited me about MxO was the claim that fighting animations would be dynamic, and that a "hit' would actually be animated as a "hit" by ensuring that the fist/foot of one character connected with a predetermined "contact point" on the opponent's model.

Sadly, when I saw MxO in beta, it was running at about 1 FPS with horrible lag, so I never got to see any of those snazzy animations.  Ah well.

"Nice attempted blast about my "drinking".  I do enjoy a nice cuppa, but that is because I am a bon vivant of gregarious nature and cheery disposition." - Ab
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