Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 09, 2020, 05:42:41 PM

Login with username, password and session length

Search:     Advanced search
*
Home Help Search Login Register
f13.net  |  f13.net General Forums  |  General Discussion  |  Serious Business  |  Topic: Useless Projects 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pages: 1 ... 7 8 [9] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Useless Projects  (Read 39196 times)
Yegolev
Moderator
Posts: 24440

2/10 WOULD NOT INGEST


WWW
Reply #280 on: September 24, 2019, 09:10:56 AM

I was lamenting to a developer friend that I spend a lot of time tackling meatspace problems, and his response was: "They are ALL meatspace problems."

Why am I homeless?  Why do all you motherfuckers need homes is the real question.
They called it The Prayer, its answer was law
Mommy come back 'cause the water's all gone
01101010
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11298

You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #281 on: September 24, 2019, 11:34:34 AM

So finally... FINALLY, pulled the trigger and got some dart frogs sent. The vivarium has been holding up well and had no real die-off of the plants - even added some cheap  post bloom orchids. In fact some of these plants are a little outta control:


So I was recording the temps and humidity for the past 2 months (overkill because I'm mental) to get a feel for the ranges. Met with a few local breeders (which had nothing in stock by the way of the species the wife wanted) and got their input and what to look out for. Since I have a water side, each breeder told me to focus on temps rather than humidity since frogs will naturally find the wet spots and take a dip if they are feeling dehydrated. They also suggested that I have so many 'under' spots (under the leaves of bigger plants, etc) that humidity is sort of a non-issue.

All that said, talked with the wife and found a good spot on my schedule to be at home to received the frogs via FedEx overnight. So 3 juvenile dendrobates auratus came this AM. Bonkers how they ship, the frogs were individually packed in a plastic condiment container with a lid and a wad of sphagnum moss inside a styro shipper with some cool packs. At first I couldn't see 2 of them as they burrowed into the wad, but the one was right on the bottom. First reaction, they are fucking tiny, like fit completely on a dime tiny. None were moving so I was dreading having to call the place I bought from, but it was probably a factor of being cold and popping out into the light from a dark box. Either way, the one started moving and the others moved a leg or two to hide better. I opened the containers in the vivarium and pulled out the moss. Once they realized some big fucker was getting close they all bolted under the leaf litter or into the plants so I probably won't see them again for weeks if ever or until they get comfortable or maybe never again. They are so small, it's going to be a challenge getting pics until they start growing out. The one I did get... well, yeah.





"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
01101010
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11298

You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #282 on: September 24, 2019, 03:04:56 PM

Well got home from work and found this:


No clue where the third one is.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Sky
Terracotta Army
Posts: 30792

I love my TV an' hug my TV an' call it 'George'.


WWW
Reply #283 on: September 24, 2019, 03:28:23 PM

"Oh no...he's back!"

Count Nerfedalot
Terracotta Army
Posts: 916


Reply #284 on: September 24, 2019, 08:11:01 PM

That is so cool!  Heart Heart Heart

Yes, I know I'm paranoid, but am I paranoid enough?
Samwise
Moderator
Posts: 18060

sentient yeast infection


WWW
Reply #285 on: September 24, 2019, 10:12:10 PM

eeee!  Jelly.  Those are some amazing colors, and you've built such a cool home for them.

I hadn't seen my own resident frog in a while, but just last weekend I spotted him hanging out on Swamp Castle, all grown up:


"I have not actually recommended many games, and I'll go on the record here saying my track record is probably best in the industry." - schild
Mandella
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1129


Reply #286 on: September 25, 2019, 12:00:53 PM

Yeah you are kinda motivating me again to do one of those. I might not go the whole do-it-yourself route though and buy some prefabs.

Really interested to know how tough it is to keep them alive and happy too.

Edit: Also if you have any good advice on brands and such for temp and humidity control equipment I'm listening.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2019, 12:04:12 PM by Mandella »
01101010
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11298

You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #287 on: September 25, 2019, 01:14:21 PM

Yeah you are kinda motivating me again to do one of those. I might not go the whole do-it-yourself route though and buy some prefabs.

Really interested to know how tough it is to keep them alive and happy too.

Edit: Also if you have any good advice on brands and such for temp and humidity control equipment I'm listening.

Temps are kept in ranges (for dart frogs, 65f-80f) thus far with the ambient room temps. Frogs are nice and was a huge selling point because they don't have the steep heating requirements like snakes do. We put the vivarium in the living room which is the only room where the temp doesn't swing wildly from season to season or day to day. It does get warmer in the summer, but the AC window unit worked fine for keeping the temps in the tank in range. For the winter, probably be the same, but I have a heat mat you stick on the bottom. Also have the thermostat for it, so that will be a trial and error thing once things get colder here in Pittsburgh.

As for humidity... I was spraying it daily with a simple 1 gal plant mister. Left it for a few days and the humidity never dipped below 80%. That is mostly due to replacing the screens on the top with clear acrylic panels.  Talking with the local breeders/herp people, and they said if you have a water feature, you could ignore humidity for the most part as the frogs will take care of moving to spots around the water feature. However, they also said that I have so many plants that create humid pockets between the leaves and soil. I put the hygrometer sensor all over the tank in the last two months and the only place it dried out to <65% humidity was up at the top near the exhaust fan I put in. Otherwise, I never read anything below 85% near the soil.

So bottom line, it is way easier than I thought to keep the temps and humidity ranges steady. Put the light on a timer and the vivarium runs itself.

Now feeding is not that big a chore, but it is more of an active process. Fruit flies need to be cultured every 10-12 days. You can buy them and I think the guys I got the frogs from actually have a fruit fly subscription process where they automatically charge you and send you a new culture every 2 weeks or so. I am using 32oz Mason jars with coffee filters on the top. Start a culture with a tap from the old culture and you'll have new flies in 7-10 days. Cultures are good for 25-28 days - after that they are basically dead. But as long as you start a new culture every 12 days or so, you'll never run out. I got my first culture from the local Petco in their lizard feeding aisle. Bought the culture mix and the calcium supplement you dust the flies with on amazon and seeded a new culture and it is overflowing. I'm using some of the flies to feed my fish. That's the only real work you need to put in.

Now take all this with a grain of salt... I have had the little guys for a day, but so far I have everything I need at the ready.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Polysorbate80
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1950


WWW
Reply #288 on: November 08, 2019, 03:12:15 PM

Picked up the can of wood finish and it's too light  ACK!

Coulda sworn I had another one around...  *orders more*

“Why the fuck would you ... ?” is like 80% of the conversation with Poly — Chimpy
Polysorbate80
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1950


WWW
Reply #289 on: November 22, 2019, 10:36:13 AM

At last, after a ridiculous amount of time--and major repairs to the basement--I finished the entertainment shelf/stand/whatever:



Top angle, so the wood actually looks like a thing.  I ordered a tapa-cloth table runner to maybe put along the center of the top.  I'll have to get it and put it on to see if I really like it.



I didn't want to go through the trouble of putting a back on it, so to not have a massive shitstorm of cabling visible I attached some strips of cable tray to the back to deal with part of the mess.  Advantages to using such thick lumber...  The faux foliage hides the rest as well as the power strip.  Will probably look for some artsy stuff in Hawaii over Christmas to swap out for some of the greenery, but it depends on what I find.




“Why the fuck would you ... ?” is like 80% of the conversation with Poly — Chimpy
Viin
Terracotta Army
Posts: 6159


Reply #290 on: November 22, 2019, 10:57:19 AM

That looks awesome, nice work.

- Viin
01101010
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11298

You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #291 on: November 22, 2019, 11:11:43 AM

Someday I may have my own place and start doing home type projects. For now I'll stick to the frogs and fish. I'm actually to a point now that I need to prune the plants in the vivarium. Crazy how fast that stuff grows when happy.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
01101010
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11298

You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #292 on: February 23, 2020, 08:55:42 AM

Quick update for those who care... my cheap $2 orchids from Home Depot have popped. Creepy cool plants actually... and nice when they bloom. Might try to find different types when I rescape the vivarium.


The frogs are still kicking and being pigs. Latest awesomeness is one has started to sing. Sounds insect-like actually... a low frequency buzzing for 3-4 second bursts. Only problem, the one we thought was a female is the one 'croaking.'  Females are usually bigger and do not sing. This one fit the bill at first, but is probably a different sub-species than the others, given how many different types of auratus there are. The wife noted as they are getting older that he is slightly bluish-green than the others.  So either this one was a bit older when we got them, hence the size difference, and/or he has some different genetics. Either way... cool none-the-less. If the others are males, then at least I won't have to worry about population growth.

Obligatory photo op:
« Last Edit: February 23, 2020, 08:57:59 AM by 01101010 »

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Mandella
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1129


Reply #293 on: March 02, 2020, 11:17:41 AM

Funny that my wife was just asking if I was ever going to do anything to refurbish our tank -- and wasn't I talking about frogs?

So how noisy are they? The ones that live naturally around these parts can get pretty loud even outside.

I may just go with goldfish... Quiet, don't mind coldish water, and nobody gets too attached...
01101010
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11298

You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #294 on: March 02, 2020, 01:49:02 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvVG62ueo9s

Not mine, but same species as mine. Not loud at all... actually thought it was some bird on the porch the first time I heard mine. If I had to compare it, I would say it is sorta insect-like.

So yesterday was interesting. I slept in (to 7a EDT), made my coffee, and filled the sprayer for the frog tank. I tend to spray everything down every morning... open the door and spray the plants. Well the big boy was resting under the leaf litter right up by the door and I start spraying. Out of the corner of my eye I see a black blur go shooting out of the tank. Of course the little shit darted underneath the shelf I have the tank on once he hit the floor... so that meant taking everything off the bottom shelf and from under the shelf on the floor without smearing him. A huge pain in the ass nudging him out into the open so I could capture him, of course he was covered in dust. Got him into a cup and spritzed him in the cup, popped him back into the tank, and kept watch to make sure he wasn't doing anything weird.

Was bound to happen, but still stressful.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Sky
Terracotta Army
Posts: 30792

I love my TV an' hug my TV an' call it 'George'.


WWW
Reply #295 on: March 02, 2020, 02:40:50 PM

I really enjoyed the raptor kill box we had at the band house with a couple monitors. The Nile monitor was a predator, hunting and killing mice like a, ehm, predator. The water monitor was more of a lurker, akin to watching a croc strike from the river.

If you want to go in a more deadly (and spectator sport) direction.

 why so serious? DRILLING AND WOMANLINESS ACK!

Count Nerfedalot
Terracotta Army
Posts: 916


Reply #296 on: March 04, 2020, 09:44:13 PM

raptor kill box?  raptor = bird of prey? clever girl dinosaur?

Yes, I know I'm paranoid, but am I paranoid enough?
01101010
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11298

You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #297 on: July 08, 2020, 10:29:27 AM

Frog softcore porn alert!!

So it seems mid-July to mid-Sept is breeding season. Honestly thought I had 3 males but I might be mistaken given these two have seemly paired off and follow each other all over the tank.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQsycunJw5g

Took that last night after watching the male call and seeing the female come hopping over... then the video happened.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Samwise
Moderator
Posts: 18060

sentient yeast infection


WWW
Reply #298 on: July 08, 2020, 11:26:10 AM

giggity

Very jealous of that whole terrarium setup.

"I have not actually recommended many games, and I'll go on the record here saying my track record is probably best in the industry." - schild
01101010
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11298

You call it an accident. I call it justice.


Reply #299 on: July 10, 2020, 05:46:30 PM

Welp... Definitely have 1 female and 2 males. Been watching the males wrestle all day and the female chasing after each male after they call. Bonkers... I should have recorded it all.

That said, now I have the female tending a pile of eggs:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMuHwWOmoUg

Fun times.

"I want to watch it all burn in an orgy of smashed Coke machines and weasel rape." - HaemishM
Polysorbate80
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1950


WWW
Reply #300 on: July 10, 2020, 09:00:18 PM

I don’t have any frog eggs, but I hope to have Corgi puppies in a couple months...  Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly?

Project related, I’m building an animal watering pond that (under the influence of the wife and friends) is slowly morphing into more of a swimming hole. I’ll post some pictures of the (slow) progress tomorrow.

Although thinking about it, it will probably attract frogs...  awesome, for real

“Why the fuck would you ... ?” is like 80% of the conversation with Poly — Chimpy
Polysorbate80
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1950


WWW
Reply #301 on: July 13, 2020, 11:19:49 AM

Things to Do When Stuck Home During the Pandemic,

Or, "What Poly Did With His Summer Vacation"

I've tossed around the idea of putting in a pond for years.  Unfortunately for me, the best spot is not on my property, but right *next* to it, and the neighbor won't sell me that little half-acre that he doesn't use for anything but access back to the canyon once or twice a year.  I told him he could have an easement on the trail (it's not like I would take it out, I use it too) but no go.

So:  Next best place is a bit upstream of that in my front hayfield.  The upper field all drains through there, so where the water naturally collects it winds up diverted under my driveway with a culvert.

As long as it's a giant swamp all winter and summer, why not collect that water?



I've been told it looks like the surface of Mars (a fair observation  Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly? )  but it's a work in progress, and will continue to be one for probably the next year.

The big-ass dirt pile will actually remain there next to it.  Once the digging is done, I'll re-shape it into a proper small hill.  Later it will get grass seed, and some kind of large tree.  The tree/hill will help keep wind and sun off the pond, reducing evaporation.

I don't really know what kind of tree to put in.  A live oak with a branch trained out over the pond would be ideal--except there's no way it would survive winters here  Heartbreak  I'm currently leaning towards a sugar maple, but I haven't set my heart on anything if anyone has any ideas...?  Something attractive, with a large canopy.

This will take at least until winter 2021 to complete.  For one thing, I haven't finished digging it out.  It's 2m deep currently, but the wife and her friends want a spot to jump in, so I'm digging out a 10'x8' section down another 2-3 feet.  By hand  ACK!

Naturally, that part has made veeeeery limited progress...



The other big delay is I want to make sure I don't fuck up my drainage.  I won't know if there's issues with that until winter.  So, in case I need to do any tinkering/re-digging in the spring, I don't want to put the pond liner in.  Because it'll be about $1500 and 500 pounds of heavy shit to drag around for that, and I do NOT want to do it twice.  So it'll have to fill with water this winter, and then drain/dry out next spring/summer, and *then* I can put in the damn liner, backfill some soil (or maybe sand for the bottom), and wait until the winter after that for it to actually fill

Here it is from the drainage culvert, looking back up the hayfields


“Why the fuck would you ... ?” is like 80% of the conversation with Poly — Chimpy
Mandella
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1129


Reply #302 on: July 13, 2020, 04:21:41 PM

How come you're digging the deep part out by hand? I see you have a tractor with a scoop right there..

 awesome, for real

But yeah neat project. I kinda wish I had dug out my pool instead of setting up an above ground one, but then if I had it would have been a *lot* more difficult to dismantle when the kid moved away and I got tired of it. More specifically, tired of the cost and effort of maintenance -- I do sometimes miss floating around on a hot summer day.

As for trees, you have those in the frozen north? Not just furze on the blasted heath?
Polysorbate80
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1950


WWW
Reply #303 on: July 13, 2020, 05:28:58 PM

I can get a little bit of the deep hole with the tractor, but there’s a danger of slipping a front wheel into a 2’ deep hole. An excavator could do it safely but i don’t have one.
Rather be safe (albeit sweary?

“Why the fuck would you ... ?” is like 80% of the conversation with Poly — Chimpy
Khaldun
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11755


Reply #304 on: July 13, 2020, 09:40:01 PM

Sugar maple sounds good for canopy--and color depending on the fall and winter conditions. I like pin oaks too but they don't have great fall foliage (they just sort of dribble all season long). I love ash trees--great personality--but they're also pretty climate- finicky and also vulnerable to invasive pests.

Otherwise looks good in terms of the basic goal. If it's a spot where water flows through anyway, are you at all worried about whether the water that flows through is clean enough? e.g. there's nothing in the annual flow that you wouldn't want concentrated (pesticide, etc.)?
Polysorbate80
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1950


WWW
Reply #305 on: July 13, 2020, 10:33:02 PM

The chemical question is a fair point.

Pesticide use is rare here, but there is of course herbicide/fertilizer use.  It’s applied at times when it’s unlikely to rain enough to migrate (or the farmer is wasting money) and the herbicide generally inactivates when it hits soil. As a practical example, there are a lot of such stock ponds in the area, and I haven’t heard of one becoming unsafe for livestock or wildlife.

If anything, the danger is e. Coli bacteria if the geese set up shop in the pond 
« Last Edit: July 13, 2020, 10:35:24 PM by Polysorbate80 »

“Why the fuck would you ... ?” is like 80% of the conversation with Poly — Chimpy
MahrinSkel
Terracotta Army
Posts: 10252

When she crossed over, she was just a ship. But when she came back... she was bullshit!


Reply #306 on: July 13, 2020, 10:58:35 PM

I can get a little bit of the deep hole with the tractor, but there’s a danger of slipping a front wheel into a 2’ deep hole. An excavator could do it safely but i don’t have one.
Rather be safe (albeit sweary?
Rent a track-hoe mini excavator. Your back will consider it money well spent, and you'll have your hole in an hour or two.

--Dave

--Jello Biafra: "If evolution is outlawed, only outlaws will evolve."
Polysorbate80
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1950


WWW
Reply #307 on: July 13, 2020, 11:29:23 PM

Bah, if we were doing easy i could have borrowed the neighbors’ large excavator and had it all done in a day  why so serious?

I’ve got the rest of the year to finish .  Might as well get some exercise

“Why the fuck would you ... ?” is like 80% of the conversation with Poly — Chimpy
Mandella
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1129


Reply #308 on: July 14, 2020, 12:13:03 PM

Bah, if we were doing easy i could have borrowed the neighbors’ large excavator and had it all done in a day  why so serious?

I’ve got the rest of the year to finish .  Might as well get some exercise

You sound like me deliberately leaving the tool box in another room so I can count it as aerobic exercise..

 Oh ho ho ho. Reallllly?
Khaldun
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11755


Reply #309 on: July 17, 2020, 06:16:55 PM

I was thinking of ecoli actually among other things. It seems to me that a lot of farm ponds I see have so little water movement that they turn brown and kind of depressing and smell bad--that it's worth thinking about actually digging out a drainage channel or having a fine rock/pebble bed or planting grasses--something that makes the pond into more of a wetland that is both scenic and environmentally cleansing.
Count Nerfedalot
Terracotta Army
Posts: 916


Reply #310 on: July 17, 2020, 08:45:39 PM

I don't have the land for it so haven't researched it much, but most of the ponds around here either put in a fountain or have to deal with algae blooms. or both.  but then most of the ponds around here (heart of the Kentucky bluegrass) are on over-fertilized horse farms with both chemical and biological runoff to deal with.

Yes, I know I'm paranoid, but am I paranoid enough?
Khaldun
Terracotta Army
Posts: 11755


Reply #311 on: July 17, 2020, 09:06:04 PM

Yeah, I see some in the Brandywine that have fountains.

And I gather that some folks also put something in the ponds that keeps mosquitos from laying eggs in them. Fish and tadpoles work too but if you have racoons, herons etc. around they tend to pretty mercilessly wipe out that life unless the pond is so big and connected to a local water ecosystem that it naturally replenishes that life.
Count Nerfedalot
Terracotta Army
Posts: 916


Reply #312 on: July 17, 2020, 09:23:53 PM

yeah, there's a BT bacteria thing that works great to kill mosquitos, but fairly pricey I think.  and some copper compound that's often needed to knock back the algae. you can really see the difference, before and after application, within a week a pond can go from covered in scum to clear again.

Yes, I know I'm paranoid, but am I paranoid enough?
Polysorbate80
Terracotta Army
Posts: 1950


WWW
Reply #313 on: July 19, 2020, 11:03:18 AM

For being in the dry-ass middle of nowhere, we have a surprising number of frogs.  I find them out in my flower garden and strawberry patch all the time

The pond will be seasonal despite my efforts to slow evaporation/drainage, so the hayfield grass will wind up spreading back down into it over time.  Except for the deep portion which will get sand instead of soil for backfill

“Why the fuck would you ... ?” is like 80% of the conversation with Poly — Chimpy
Pages: 1 ... 7 8 [9] Go Up Print 
f13.net  |  f13.net General Forums  |  General Discussion  |  Serious Business  |  Topic: Useless Projects  
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.10 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC